Educational Leadership & Policy 2014 Faculty Accomplishments

August 19, 2014 Leave a comment

Educational Leadership & Policy faculty have been hard at work in 2014. Their accomplishments include:

  • A total of 27 publications (17 refereed journal articles, 2 books, 8 book chapters and reviews) and a number of reports published or in press in 2014.
  • A total award of $10,328,535 for research and service projects which provided training and funding opportunities for graduate students, and many grant proposals currently under review.
  • Housing two top journals in the field: Educational Researcher and Comparative Education Review.

For a complete list of Educational Leadership & Policy faculty members, visit:

http://coe.fsu.edu/Faculty-Staff2/Faculty-Staff-Directory/ELPS-Faculty-Profiles/Educational-Leadership-Policy-Faculty

FSU College of Education welcomes new faculty

August 18, 2014 Leave a comment

This year, the FSU College of Education welcomes 5 new faculty members to the Tallahassee campus and 1 new faculty member to the Panama City Campus:

Courtney Preston: Educational Leadership and Policy Studies

Graig Chow: Educational Psychology and Learning Systems

Kathleen Krach: Educational Psychology and Learning Systems

Sarah Ivy: School of Teacher Education, Visual Disabilities 

Wenxia Wang: School of Teacher Education, Foreign and Second Language Teaching

Elizabeth Crowe: School of Teacher Education, Panama City Campus

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Categories: College of Education

Dr. Resier and Office of Research host 2014 Research Poster Session

August 15, 2014 Leave a comment

Dr. Robert Reiser and the Office of Research organized a poster session where faculty members shared their research projects with one another.

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Categories: College of Education

Instructional Systems Professor & Carney Labs Work to Create Video Game to Teach Physics

August 8, 2014 Leave a comment

Dr. Valerie Shute, Professor of Instructional Systems, has partnered with Carney Labs to develop a computer game that teaches physics to students around the world. “Tomorrow’s workers need 21st century competencies that include being able to effectively solve hard problems, persist in the face of failure, and think creatively, critically, and systemically,” Shute said. “Our goal is to validly assess these 21st century competencies using games and other immersive learning environments as the main vehicle.” For more information, visit:

http://news.fsu.edu/More-FSU-News/New-partnership-uses-video-games-to-teach-physics?utm_content=buffer9c6a1&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

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Categories: College of Education

Dr. Pfeiffer will be Keynote Speaker at Czech Republic Gifted Conference

August 5, 2014 Leave a comment

Dr. Steven Pfeiffer, Professor and Coordinator of the Combined Doctoral Program in Counseling Psychology and School Psychology, will be the keynote speaker at the Czech Republic Gifted Conference in October.

Dr. Pfeiffer is a laureate of Excellence in Research, awarded by Mensa International Foundation for Education and Research for his work in the field of creativity and emotional intelligence. He is a recognized authority in the field of mental health of gifted children and their families.

For more information on the Czech Republic Gifted Conference, visit http://www.nadanizaci.cz/workshop/prednasky-prednasejici

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Categories: College of Education

Dean Driscoll Appointed President-Elect of CADREI

July 30, 2014 Leave a comment

Dean Marcy Driscoll has been elected by her peers to President-Elect of the Council of Academic Deans From Research Education Institutions (CADREI). She will assume the role of President in February 2015. Congratulations Dean Driscoll!

For more information on CADREI, visit http://www.cadrei.org/

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Categories: College of Education

Researchers discover MSIs are actually doing more with less

July 29, 2014 Leave a comment

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT: Dr. Toby Park (850) 644-8186
tjpark@fsu.edu

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – A recent study co-authored by Dr. Toby Park, assistant professor of Educational Leadership & Policy and Senior research associate in the Center for Postsecondary Success at FSU, revealed that minority students who attend historically black or Hispanic-serving colleges are just as likely to complete their undergraduate degree as similar minority students at traditional institutions. This challenges the previous notion that minority students who attend a minority-serving institution (MSI) will automatically face lower graduation rates than if they had attended a traditional college or university.

Park and lead author, Dr. Stella Flores, associate professor of Public Policy and Higher Education at Vanderbilt Peabody College of Education and Human Development, investigated degree attainment for Black and Hispanic students at historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and Hispanic-serving institutions (HSIs). The researchers looked past solely graduation statistics indicating that HBCUs are approximately 7 percent below traditional institutions while HSIs trail by about 11 percent.

After accounting for differences in the student populations and institutional resources, Flores and Park found no difference in graduation rates between MSIs and traditional (non-MSI) institutions. “Attending a minority-service institution does not appear to have the negative effect so often portrayed in the media,” says Park. “Given the fact that MSIs are historically underfunded, the fact that the student bodies – when matched with similar students at traditional institutions – graduate at equal rates is astonishing.”

By comparing students who were similar in preparation and background at MSIs and traditional schools, Flores and Park were able to determine a true and fair comparison on the likelihood of degree completion for black and Hispanic students. “MSIs really are doing more with less,” says Park.

Park’s general research focuses on postsecondary outcomes for populations of students who may have once been considered non-traditional. This includes student characteristics such as underrepresented minority students, low-income students, underprepared students, and first-generation students as well as their entry point into post secondary education. He currently serves as co-principal investigator for a multi-year grant, funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, to investigate the ongoing developmental educational reform in Florida.

See the links below for Park’s other work on community colleges in Texas:
USA Today-College: http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/11/20/stopping-out-college/3647685/

Inside Higher Education: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2013/11/15/students-are-unlikely-graduate-if-they-stop-out-more-once-study-finds

The National Journal: http://www.nationaljournal.com/next-america/education/life-after-community-college-20140610

Toby Park, Education Leadership & Policy.  He chose #1

Categories: College of Education
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