Home > College of Education > School psychologists help students thrive during National School Psychology Awareness Week—November 10–14, 2014

School psychologists help students thrive during National School Psychology Awareness Week—November 10–14, 2014

November 3, 2014 Leave a comment Go to comments

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Jennie Harrison, jcharrison@fsu.edu

(850) 644-6798

November 3, 2014

Bethesda, MD—The National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) has designated November 10–14, 2014 as National School Psychology Awareness Week. This year’s theme, “Strive. Grow. THRIVE!” highlights the continuum of engagement necessary to children’s healthy learning and development. Schools around the country will be taking part in events and activities designed to help students and schools thrive.

NASP President Stephen E. Brock points to the important role of school psychologists in promoting school and life success for students. “School psychologists work with students and teachers every day to promote wellness and resilience, reinforce communication and social skills, and increase achievement academically, socially, behaviorally, and emotionally. This year, school psychologists around the country will be helping not only students but also school staff and families to understand the important links between striving, growing, and thriving.”

“As educators, we know that children learn and grow by tapping into their natural abilities, taking on new challenges, and developing new skills, with the proper guidance and support,” says Brock “The learning environment is the ideal setting to help students build on their strengths and understand how striving leads to growth, both of which are critical to thriving. Facilitating the strive-grow-thrive cycle is essential to promoting competency, academic achievement, social–emotional wellness, and resilience, and it is entirely in keeping with the mission and purpose of schools.

Additionally, school psychologists will be collaborating with school staff to reinforce the common elements of a thriving school community. “Many of the School Psychology Awareness Week resources and activities can be applied to whole-school initiatives,” notes Brock. “This includes strengthening positive relationships between adults and students, improving behavior, establishing welcoming school environments, reinforcing a sense of mutual respect, and contributing to the good of the whole group”.

Several NASP programs are in place to reinforce aspects of the theme. School staff can use the Student POWER Award to recognize those students who strive to make a difference through hard work, personal optimism, and dedication to others. The Possibilities in Action Partnership Award recognizes the contributions of teachers, administrators, other staff, and parents make to support the needs of the whole child. And the Gratitude Works program is designed to help students focus on positive relationships, mature socially, and grow an understanding of the world by fostering gratitude through a variety of activities.

As part of National School Psychology Awareness Week, school psychologists at Florida State University will be adapting resources and activities provided by NASP.

NASP represents 25,000 school psychologists throughout the United States and abroad. NASP empowers school psychologists by advancing effective practices to improve students’ learning, behavior, and mental health.

For further information contact Jennie Harrison or NASP Director of Communications Kathy Cowan at 301-347-1665 or kcowan@naspweb.org, or visit www.nasponline.org.

Categories: College of Education
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