Faculty News

June 12, 2017

Roger Kaufman is professor emeritus at Florida State University where he has received a Professorial Excellence award. He also has served as Research Professor of Engineering Management at the Old Dominion University; Norfolk; Virginia and associated with the faculty of industrial engineering at the University of Central Florida.

The International Society for Performance Improvement (ISPI) created the Roger Kaufman Award for Societal Impact in honor of Dr. Kaufman to recognize the continuous achievement of measurable positive societal impact by an individual or organization.

This year, the Roger Kaufman Awards Committee created three new categories for the Award:

  • Non-Profit: non profit organizations with social impact
  • For profit – Social impact: for profit organizations with social impact
  • Social startups & innovative projects: new organizations or initiatives with social impact

The 2017 Awards went to:

  • Non-Profit: Social Impact: US Coast Guard
  • For Profit: Social Impact: John Mackey – Whole Planet, Whole Planet Foundation
  • Social startups & innovative projects: Blake Micoskey – Toms Shoes


Learn more about the Roger Kaufman Awards and the awardees
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June 9, 2017

Marty Swanbrow Becker is an assistant professor of

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Assistant Professor Marty Swanbrow Becker

Psychological and Counseling Services in the Educational Psychology and Learning Systems Department at the FSU College of Education. His current research examines the personal and contextual factors that influence the progression of adolescents and young adults along a distress and suicidal continuum of experience with a focus on stress, coping, resilience, help seeking, and diversity of background. He also explores the efficacy of suicide prevention interventions and applies the knowledge gained to design and deliver programs to reduce the prevalence of suicidal experiences among adolescents and young adults.

This week, Dr. Swanbrow Becker shared the need for schools to leverage the impact of the show “13 Reasons Why” to reduce suicide risk in schools and engage in much needed discussion with students about suicide. 

“’13 Reasons Why’ presents a unique opportunity to start a conversation with young people about suicide,” said Swanbrow Becker. “Our schools should harness this moment to bring the problem of youth suicide out in the open and help students in distress ask for help.”

Click here to read the full article from Brookings.

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June 2, 2017

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Dr. James delivers the Zeigler keynote address

Department of Sport Management Chair Jeffrey D. James received the 2017 Earle F. Zeigler Lecture Award and delivered the Zeigler keynote address at the North American Society for Sport Management Conference in Denver on Thursday, June 1.

The Earle F. Zeigler Lecture Award is the most prestigious NASSM award and may only be bestowed on an individual once over the course of his/her career. Recipients have a minimum of ten years of service as a teacher, supervisor, administrator, or combination and have made significant contributions to the field in terms of scholarship, research, leadership, and peer recognition of his/her contributions.

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May 25, 2017

"College of Education faculty members."

Dr. Valerie Shute

The National Science Foundation and the Institute of Education Sciences awarded a total of $4 million to Valerie Shute, the Mack and Effie Campbell Tyner Endowed Professor of Education in the Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems, to study the design, development and evaluation of immersive games to support physics competencies over the next four years.

The National Science Foundation awarded Shute a three-year, $1.1 million Cyberlearning Development Grant in September 2016. This grant builds on Shute’s prior research that used stealth assessment, or the embedding of evaluations deeply within games, to measure students’ understanding of physics competencies, such as Newton’s laws of force and motion.

The second award from the National Science Foundation is a three-year, $1.5 million Education and Human Resources grant to study how interpersonal interactions influence collaborative problem solving processes and outcomes in digital STEM learning environments. The study will specifically focus on modeling and measuring the dynamic processes of collaborative problem solving and their effects on physics understanding and interest.

In August, the Institute of Education Sciences will award Shute a four-year, $1.4 million grant to study theoretically guided learning supports that can improve both the learning experience and learning outcomes in STEM learning games. This study will measure students’ current cognitive skills, real-time affective states and how to use the data to provide meaningful supports. The knowledge gained from this study will contribute to the design of next-generation learning games that promote both STEM competency development and interest.

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April 27, 2017

On March 25, Florida State University recognized the contributions and achievements of outstanding faculty members, including three from the FSU College of Education, at the annual Faculty Awards Dinner. 

  • Fengfeng Ke, associate professor in the Department of Educational Psychology & Learning Systems, was presented with a Developing Scholar Award. This award recognizes mid-career associate professor-level faculty with a one-time allowance of $10,000 to support their research programs.
  • Kathie Guthrie, associate professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, was recognized with a Graduate Faculty Mentor Award. Recipients of this award, which is sponsored annually by the Graduate School, are chosen for outstanding mentoring practices and service to graduate education and receive $3,000.
  • Linda Schrader, teaching faculty in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, was honored with a Graduate Teaching Award celebrating superlative graduate teaching. Nominations for this award are submitted by students and alumni, and each recipient is awarded a $2,000 stipend.

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April 19, 2017

"College of Education faculty members."

Fengfeng Ke, associate professor in the Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems

A College of Education faculty member has been recognized for their scholarly activities at Florida State University. 

Fengfeng Ke, associate professor in the Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems, has been selected to receive a Developing Scholar Award. 

Sponsored annually by the Council on Research and Creativity (CRC), this award is designed to recognize FSU faculty who are several years into their careers while also identifying and honoring FSU’s future academic leaders.

Departments nominate their most qualified tenured associate professors. The CRC then recommends up to five candidates to the University President who then ratifies those recommendations.

Ke will be honored on Tuesday, April 25 at the Faculty Awards Dinner.
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April 18, 2017

Every year, the FSU College of Education honors several members of the FSU College Education family for their service and dedication to the college. This year at the All College of Education Spring Meeting held Monday, April 17, 2017, FSU COE honored three faculty/staff members.

Lindsay Dennis, assistant professor of early childhood education in the School of Teacher Education, received the College of Education Undergraduate Teaching Award. In her current role at Florida State University, Dr. Dennis teaches courses including Early Childhood Foundations, Early Childhood Observation/Participation, and Early Childhood Curriculum and Methods. Her research focuses on early literacy skill development as well as best practices for including all children at the preschool level.

Tamara Bertrand Jones, associate professor of higher education in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, received the College of Education Graduate Teaching Award. In addition to teaching courses, Dr. Jones is also an associate director of the Center for Postsecondary Success, and founder and past president of Sisters of the Academy Institute. Her research examines the sociocultural influences on socialization during graduate education and the professional experiences of underrepresented populations, particularly Black women, in academia.

Gloria Colvin, a faculty and graduate research services librarian and the FSU College of Education library liaison, was honored for her years of service and dedication to Florida State University and COE as the college wished her farewell and a happy retirement. Her responsibilities included research consultations, presentations to classes and groups of researchers, collection development and research support.  Colvin also coordinated the liaison program for the FSU Libraries, helping establish partnerships between the Libraries and other campus units.  Some of her many accomplishments include initiating a faculty delivery service, leading the FSU Libraries’ strategic planning process and beginning scholarly communication initiatives.

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April 3, 2017

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Kathy Guthrie, associate professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies

A Florida State University faculty member has been recognized for their outstanding mentoring practices and an overall commitment to graduate education at Florida State University. 

Kathy Guthrie, associate professor of higher education in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, has been selected to receive a Graduate Faculty Mentor Award. 

Sponsored annually by the FSU Graduate School, this award honors faculty mentors whose dedication to graduate students and commitment to excellence in graduate education and mentoring have made significant contributions to the quality of life and professional development of graduate students at the university.

Guthrie and the other mentors will be honored on Tuesday, April 25 at the Faculty Awards Dinner.
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March 14, 2017

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Courtney Preston, assistant professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies

A Florida State University faculty member has been recognized for for their invaluable contribution of exemplary, thorough, and timely reviews of manuscripts by the American Educational Research Association (AERA) and Educational Researcher

Courtney Preston, assistant professor of Educational Leadership and Policy in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, has been selected as an Outstanding Reviewer for 2016. 

AERA, founded in 1916, is a national research society that strives to advance knowledge about education, to encourage scholarly inquiry related to education, and promote the use of research to improve education and serve the public good. Educational Researcher (ER), one of AERA’s journals publishes scholarly articles that are of general significance to the education research community and that come from a wide range of areas of education research and related disciplines.

Preston and the other reviewers will be honored on Friday, April 28 at the 2017 AERA Annual Meeting in San Antonio, Texas.
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February 8, 2017

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Robert Schwartz, professor and chair of the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies

A Florida State University faculty member has been recognized for his outstanding work in the student affairs profession by the Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education (NASPA). 

Robert Schwartz, professor and chair of the FSU College of Education’s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, has been selected as the recipient of the 2017 Robert H. Shaffer Award for Academic Excellence as a Graduate Faculty Member. The award, named for a dean and professor emeritus at Indiana University, is presented to a tenured, full-time faculty member in a graduate preparation program in student affairs.

Schwartz teaches courses in higher education, student affairs and the history of education, and he currently serves as his department’s chair and the program director for the Certificate in Institutional Research.

Schwartz and the other winners will be honored in March at the 2017 NASPA Annual Conference in San Antonio, Texas.

Read more.
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February 1, 2017

ella-mae-danielFlorida State University School of Teacher Education Teaching Faculty, Ella-Mae Daniel will be the Keynote Speaker at the W.E.B DuBois Dean’s List Reception on Feb. 2.

W.E.B DuBois Honor Society was founded at Florida State University in 1991. The purpose of the W.E.B. DuBois Honor Society is to nurture a spirit of scholarship, to recognize and encourage leadership, to provide service, and to establish the opportunity for a meaningful exchange of ideas as individuals and as a group. The intention is to support the self-awareness of our members, to promote equal opportunities among all peoples, and to emphasize the scholastic advancement of African American scholars.

W.E.B DuBois Honor Society hosts the Dean’s List Reception for African-American students at Florida State University whom have earned an FSU GPA of 3.5 or higher, so that they are recognized for their academic achievement. The purpose is to honor minority students at Florida State University for their academic success so that they are aware it does not go unnoticed.

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January 30, 2017

"College of Education faculty and staff headshots. Bradley Cox"

Florida State University Associate Professor of Higher Education in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, Bradley E. Cox, Ph.D. recently received a National Science Foundation grant to study how college students with autism perform in intro-level STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) classes, and whether or not they benefitted from existing campus support.

His grant research was featured in the Times Herald-Record article, What Colleges are Doing to Support the Growing Number of Students with Autism.

To read the article, click here.

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January 27, 2017

Florida State University Department of Sport Management Associate Professor Michael Giardina, Ph.D.Screen Shot 2017-01-27 at 12.04.47 PM.png and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Professor Emeritus Norman Denzin have published a book examining the constantly changing, and increasingly market-orientated lives of scholarly academics.

Being released April 16, “Qualitative Inquiry in Neoliberal Times,” will be a must-read for faculty and students interested in the changing dynamics of their profession, whether theoretically, methodologically, or structurally and materially.

To learn more and purchase the book, click here.

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January 19, 2017

dr-james-bw-1The FSU College of Education’s Department of Sport Management Chair, Dr. Jeffrey D. James has been selected as the 2017 recipient of the Earle F. Zeigler Lecture Award. The Zeigler Award is the most prestigious North American Society for Sport Management award and is only be bestowed on an individual once over the course of their career.

Dr. James is a Professor of Sport Management. His research focuses on the psychological connection people form with sport objects, whether that is a particular sport, team, athlete, or other sport object. He has conducted research on the development and maintenance of fan loyalty, the transference of loyalty, and the development of a sport identity.Dr. James has over 40 refereed works published in various journals including the Journal of Sport Management, Sport Management Review, Journal of Sport Behavior, Leisure Studies, International Journal of Sport Management, Sport Marketing Quarterly, Journal of Business Ethics,and the Journal of Marketing Theory and Practice. He has an edited book, Sport Marketing Across the Spectrum: Selected Research from Emerging, Developing, and Established Scholars, and has participated in over 70 presentations at various international conferences.

TheEarle F. Zeigler Lecture Award will be presented to Dr. James at the 2017 North American Society for Sport Management Conference in Denver.

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December 6, 2016

FSU College of Education Assistant Professor Dr. Laura Steacy is one of the six researchers studying “context-dependent” phonics constraints.

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The English language is filled with complex and inconsistent letter-sound correspondences, as illustrated in the image above

Ask a child to spell the word “fish” and you probably wouldn’t expect the response, “G-H-0-T-I.” However, according to Dr. Don Compton, Director of the Florida Center for Reading Research at Florida State University, the spelling actually makes sense. Compton explains, “If you take the sound “gh” makes in word, “tough” add the “o” sound from the word, “women,” and end with the sound “T-I” makes in the suffix, “tion,” you end up with “fish.”

While this is certainly an extreme example it does illustrate some of the issues facing children as they learn to read English. Namely, where letters occur in a word and what letters are adjacent to these letters influence the pronunciations. For instance, as children learn to read words with the vowel grapheme ea (e.g., head and beam) they will become sensitive to the fact that the final consonant influences the vowel pronunciation such that “ea” is more likely to be pronounced as /ɛ/ (rhyming with head) when it occurs before d than when it occurs before other consonant letters.

These “context-dependent” phonics constraints are at the center of a new set of studies, funded by an NICHD Learning Disabilities Innovation Hub grant, being conducted by Compton and colleagues.

“The English written language is riddled with systematic, yet often inconsistent letter-sound relationships. The goal of this new Hub is to help fill in the gaps of our collective knowledge to help better understand how young readers acquire these sound-to-spelling skills. Our hope is to identify important factors that can lead to improved evidence-based instructional practices for children who struggle with learning to read.”

The multidisciplinary Hub team also includes noted Florida State researchers Drs. Laura

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FCRR researchers (left to right) Drs. Petscher, Compton, and Steacy

Steacy and Yaacov Petscher, as well as Drs. Kenneth Pugh and Stephen Frost from Haskins Laboratories and Dr. Jay Rueckl of the University of Connecticut.

The NICHD LD Hubs, launched in 2012, strive to address the causes, symptoms, and treatments of learning disabilities that impact reading, writing, and mathematics. The Hubs explore understudied research topics and conduct projects that study those diagnosed with and at-risk for learning disabilities.

For more information about the Florida Center for Reading Research at Florida State University, visit http://fcrr.org/.

 

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December 6, 2016

Former FSU College of Education Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies

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Randy Hanna, dean of FSU Panama City

adjunct faculty member Randy Hanna was promoted to the dean of FSU Panama City.

 

On Nov. 30, Florida State University Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs Sally McRorie announced the selection of Randy Hanna as the dean of FSU Panama City. 

Hanna has served as FSU Panama City’s interim dean since Aug. 1, 2016, leading up to his permanent appointment to the position. 

“Randy Hanna’s outstanding leadership has already benefited FSU Panama City, and I am confident he will direct the college to even greater accomplishments,” McRorie said. “His experience in many roles in higher education has proven to be invaluable as we work to expand educational, research and service opportunities at the FSU Panama City campus and throughout the region.” 

Hanna is looking forward to continuing to serve FSU Panama City’s students, faculty and staff. 

“Over the past four months, I have had the opportunity to work with a great group of faculty, staff and students and am excited about the future of FSU in this region of Florida,” Hanna said.  “We will do everything possible to continue to deliver outstanding educational opportunities to students.” 

Hanna also recognized the strong support from the community for the campus.  

“I have seen few places where there is such a strong connection between the campus and the community,” he said.  “We will work hard to make sure that we meet the needs of the community.” 

Hanna previously served as a research faculty member at the university’s Learning Systems Institute and as chancellor of the Florida College System. 

At the Learning Systems Institute, Hanna co-directed a program that provides educational opportunities to academic professionals and governmental officials who are developing higher education programs in India, Ukraine and Central America. 

In addition, Hanna is affiliated with the FSU College of Education’s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies where he has taught graduate courses. He previously served as a member of the governing boards of Florida A&M University, the University of West Florida and Tallahassee Community College, and as chairman of the State Board of Community Colleges. Hanna also is an attorney and previously served as the managing shareholder at Bryant Miller Olive, a multistate law firm. 

Hanna earned a doctorate in higher education management from the University of Pennsylvania in 2014. In addition, he earned a Master of Business Administration degree from Emory University in 2004 and a law degree with high honors from Florida State in 1983. 

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December 2, 2016

Two FSU College of Education faculty members, Robert Schwartz and Deborah Ebener, were among those honored by the Transformation Through Teaching program for their transformative influence in the lives of their students inside and outside of the classroom.

The Transformation Through Teaching program is an initiative established by FSU’s Spiritual Life Project, which seeks to foster integrative relationships that provide support for students in their lifelong search for meaning and self-realization.

The Transformation Through Teaching awards recognize faculty members whose contributions in the lives of their students go beyond conventional academic instruction. Honorees are nominated by their students for their dedication to helping students find their authentic selves and pursue their dreams.

The awards were conferred Nov. 28 during a ceremony at the President’s house.

“The faculty here tonight are not only teachers and researchers, they are mentors, role models and cheerleaders,” President John Thrasher said. “They offer advice and encouragement, and they push their students to reach higher.”

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Dr. Deborah Ebener and Kara Dingess

Deborah Ebener, associate professor and coordinator of counselor education, was nominated by Kara Dingess for her abiding support during a time of hospitalization.

“All the FSU faculty members that I have had contact with have all be truly wonderful. My experience with Dr. Ebener is different in that she went out of her way to check on me every day, as well as letting all of the other faculty members know what was going on. Knowing that I had her on my side, allowed me to relax and concentrate on getting myself better.” — Kara Dingess

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Dr. Robert Schwartz and Sally Watkins

Robert Schwartz, professor of educational leadership and policy studies, was selected by Sally Watkins for providing guidance during the difficult process of composing a doctoral dissertation.

“Deciding on a dissertation topic, for me, was a challenging process. As an individual often distracted by “shiny things”, I regularly waffled on the subject and directions. Dr. Schwartz embraced my approach and engaged me in conversation to clarify and refine my topic as well as reflect on my plans following graduation.” — Sally Watkins

For more information and the full list of faculty members that were honored, visit https://news.fsu.edu/news/university-news/2016/12/01/faculty-members-honored-transformative-influence-student-lives/.

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November 17, 2016

On Wednesday, November 16, the Florida State University Office of Distance Learning celebrated faculty and mentors for their contributions to online education during the 2015–2016 Distance Learning Awards held at the Alumni Center Ballroom.

Two faculty members and one doctoral student from the FSU College of Education were honored for their service and dedication.

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Mary Frances Hanline, Linda Schrader and Jennifer Blalock at the FSU Office of Distance Learning’s 2015-2016 Distance Learning Awards

Mary Frances Hanline, professor in School of Teacher Education, was presented with an award for Excellence in Online Teaching for the effective use of online teaching strategies that demonstrate superior methods of instruction and student engagement.

Linda Schrader, clinical professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, was given an award for Excellence in Online Course Design. Excellence in Online Course Design recognized high-quality instructional materials, learning objectives, assessment strategies, learner interaction and engagement, course technologies, learner support and accessibility.

“I learned a lot about different technologies that I could use to foster student engagement and collaboration,” said Schrader, who taught the course Qualitative Research and Evaluation Methods. “One of the things that I’ve learned in working through the design of this course is that there were elements that I put into the online course that I hadn’t really considered for my face-to-face, so I’m hoping to take some of the ideas and transfer them into my campus-faced courses.”

Jennifer Blalock, a course mentor for the Educational Leadership and Administration Master’s Degree Program and an Education Policy Ph.D. Candidate, received an award for Excellence in Online Mentoring for the successful use of strategies for student support and engagement in the course materials and learning environment.

For more information visit http://news.fsu.edu/news/university-news/2016/11/17/faculty-members-honored-service-online-education/.

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November 15, 2016

steven-testifying-italian-parliament-on-behalf-of-gifted-nov-2016On Monday, November 7, in front of the Italian Parliament, Steven Pfeiffer, professor and director of clinical training at the FSU College of Education, was the main speaker at a conference on the needs of gifted students in Rome.

The conference, held in Rome, Italy, was organized by the Committee on Culture, Science and Education of the Chamber of the Deputies and the nonprofit Step-net. It aimed to educate policymakers to recognize and support giftedness in schools.

For more information visit http://www.giftedness.it/giftednessfuture/index.php.

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November 14, 2016

On Saturday, October 8, the Florida State University Department of Mathematics hosted its annual Math Fun Day and four volunteers from the FSU College of Education’s School of Teacher Education took on leadership roles at the event by Screen Shot 2016-11-14 at 4.09.28 PM.pngpresenting hands-on workshops.

Each year, the Department of Mathematics hosts Math Fun Day. Faculty, staff, and student volunteers from across campus engage with the community to demonstrate that “MATH is FUN,” and to celebrate the importance, ubiquity, beauty and fun of mathematics.

This year, Math Fun Day included presentations, exhibits, and activities for the public,  and was staffed by more than 60 volunteers from the Department of Mathematics, Meteorology Department, Department of Computer Science, Department of Biological Science, and the School of Teacher Education. More than 800 people participated in this year’s event, and it was the most successful Math Fun Day to date. 

The FSU College of Education’s School of Teacher Education volunteers were:

  • Dr. Christine Andrews-Larson, assistant professor of Mathematics Education presented a hands-on workshop on modeling
  • Dr. Ian Whitacre, assistant professor of Elementary Mathematics Education taught a workshop on common core math, respectively
  • Chian Can, an FSU COE Graduate student, gave a hands-on workshop on trigonometry
  • Sebnem Atabas, an FSU COE Graduate student, led a modeling workshop.

At the end of the day, the consensus was that Math Fun Day made a positive impact on the Tallahassee community and helped to instill a love of math in many of the children and families who attended.

“My daughter started participating in Mini-Mu competitions. She was excited because she is getting questions correct and she says it is because she attended Math Fun Day last year! We had to come back this year.”

“Thank you so much for this event! My son has been seriously struggling in math over the last two years, and the fact he had a discouraging/negative teacher last year didn’t help. As a result, he has developed a negative idea of math. Needless to say, he was not happy about coming today. By the end of the day, however, he used words like “cool!” “awesome!” and “amazing!”, and he began leading ME around to the sessions! He seemed excited about math again. This was time well spent! Thanks so much again!”

For more information about the FSU Department of Mathematics’ Math Fun Day, visit http://www.math.fsu.edu/MathFunDay/.

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November 3, 2016

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Dr. Fengfeng Ke

A Florida State University researcher has received a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to pilot an innovative and potentially transformative approach to science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) graduate education. 

Fengfeng Ke, associate professor of Instructional Systems and Learning Technologies in the College of Education, was awarded $499,994 through an Innovations in Graduate Education grant from the NSF to study the effects of a mixed-reality integrated training pilot program. The program will provide teaching practice to STEM graduate teaching assistants.                               

“STEM is vital to the growth and innovation of our society, yet students are leaving STEM degree programs at an alarming rate, often as a result of ineffective teaching,” Ke said. “Since graduate teaching assistants are the next generation of STEM instructors, it is important we meet the current attrition rate challenges by preparing them not only to become researchers, but also instructors.”

Ke will serve as the principal investigator on the project and Xin Yuan, professor of Computer Science, will serve as co-principal investigator. They are among 24 awardees who received a combined $50.8 million from the NSF Research Traineeship program to address key issues in the scientific community, including educating and building the science and engineering workforce, broadening participation in STEM education to include traditionally underserved populations and creating new resources at institutions that train STEM graduate students.

The training of current and future college and university instructors is critical to the adoption of teaching or curriculum reforms, yet graduate students, who are both trained for and pushed toward academic jobs, remain unprepared for a key responsibility of these jobs: teaching.

Ke’s project, “Mixed Reality Integrated Teaching Training for STEM Graduate Teaching Assistants,” will integrate 3D virtual reality and body sensory technology to enable STEM graduate teaching assistants to practice, observe and reflect on teaching in a variety of instructional settings. The goal is to provide them with a deeper understanding of teaching strategies through active experimentation and problem solving. The teaching training model is anticipated to improve teaching in introductory STEM courses, improve the persistence of underrepresented groups in STEM disciplines by broadening the teaching practices used in introductory STEM courses and address specific challenges and needs associated with the variety of STEM graduate students. 

For more information, visit https://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=1632965.

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November 3, 2016

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Christine Andrews-Larson

Christine Andrews-Larson, assistant professor of mathematics education, and Sherry Southerland, professor of science education, are part of a five-member team of Florida State University researchers working to develop coding modules for middle school mathematics classes that teach math and computer science concepts together.

Led by Professor of Computer Science Xin Yuan and aided by a $1.1 million National Science Foundation grant, this research team is trying to make coding cool for middle school students.

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Sherry Southerland

The work is part of the NSF’s growing emphasis on increasing the number of women and minorities in computer science. Only 18 percent of computer science undergraduates were women in 2012, according to the most recent NSF data available. In 2010-2011, less than four percent of computer science undergraduate degrees were awarded to African-American students.

To read more from FSU News, click here.

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October 20, 2016

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Kathy Guthrie

Kathy Guthrie, associate professor of higher education, director of the Leadership
Learning Research Center, and coordinator of the Undergraduate Certificate in Leadership Studies at Florida State University, was named a 2017 
American College Personnel Association (ACPA) Diamond Honoree. 

The Diamond Honoree Program, established in 1999, is way for those that care about students – and the research, scholarship, and programs that promote student development and success – to help advance our association’s efforts.

Diamond Honorees are “Championed” by dedicated individuals who recognize their specific contributions and choose to raise funds in honor of each Diamond Honoree’s outstanding and sustained commitment to higher education through student affairs and student development. 
 
Those funds are then utilized to help sustain the ACPA Foundation in its support of the research, scholarship, and programs that advance our field as a whole. 

For more information about the Diamond Honoree Class of 2017, click here

To support the ACPA Foundation in honor of the Class of 2017 Diamond Honoree Kathy Guthrie, click here.

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October 17, 2016

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Dr. Steven Pfeiffer

Steven Pfeiffer, Ph.D., a professor and director of clinical training at Florida State University, will be a workshop presenter at the 2016 Berta Excellence in Education Workshop on Monday, Oct. 18, 7 p.m. and Tuesday, Oct. 19 at 8:30 a.m.

The Berta Excellence in Education Workshop, presented by The Center for Gifted Studies, brings in experts in the field of gifted education to conduct seminars and presentations designed to empower parents and educators with tools needed to better meet the social and emotional needs of gifted students. 

Located on the WKU campus in Bowling Green, KY, The Center for Gifted Studies has been serving children who are gifted and talented, their educators, and their parents for more than 30 years. The Center provides exciting educational opportunities for gifted young people, rigorous professional development for teachers, and support for parents of gifted young people. 

Dr. Pfeiffer’s workshop will focus on ways to increase the likelihood that gifted students grow up to be well-adjusted, psychologically happy, and successful. Participants will be exposed to research-based ideas that promote what Dr. Steven Pfeiffer calls “strengths of the heart.” According to Pfeiffer, strengths of the heart consist of an amalgam of three constructs that, together, make a real difference in the lives of gifted youth: social competence, emotional intelligence, and character strengths.

For more information about the Berta Excellence in Education Workshop, click here

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October 10, 2016

"College of Education faculty and staff headshots. Bradley Cox"

Dr. Brad Cox

Brad Cox, Ph.D., (Education) received a three-year, $300,000 award from the National Science Foundation to study autism among college students in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) majors. The study will be the largest ever to focus on autism-related characteristics among college students in the United States. More than 16,000 students with autism enter college every year, and one-third major in science, technology, engineering and math.


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September 8, 2016

"College of Education faculty members."

Fengfeng Ke

Fenfeng Ke, Ph.D. (Educational Psychology and Learning Systems), received a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to examine “Mixed Reality Integrated Teaching Training For STEM Graduate Teaching Assistants.”

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September 8, 2016

"College of Education faculty members."

Valerie Shute

Valerie Shute, Ph.D. (Educational Psychology and Learning Systems), received a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to examine “Game-based Assessment and Support of STEM-related Competencies.”

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September 8, 2016

"College of Education faculty and staff headshots. Susan Losh"

Susan Losh

Susan Losh, Ph.D. (Educational Psychology), received $179,999 from the NSF’s National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics to examine “What’s Happened with American Adult Understanding of Science Knowledge and Process: 1979-2016.” The project examines how gender, ethnicity and dimensions of education relate to civic science and technology literacy over time and by generation.

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August 17, 2016

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Dr. James Sampson

The University of Jyväskylä granted an Honorary Doctorate degree to Dr. James Sampson, FSU College of Education Professor and Associate Dean for Faculty Development, on Sunday, Aug. 14.

 

Dr. Sampson is the Mode L. Stone Distinguished Professor of Counseling and Career Development in the Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems where he has taught courses since 1982. In 1986, he was appointed Co-Director of the Center for the Study of Technology in Counseling and Career Development, a research center established at FSU to improve the design and use of computer applications in counseling and guidance. Since 2008, he has served as Associate Dean for Faculty Development in the College of Education.

Sampson received his Ph.D. in Counselor Education from the University of Florida in 1977 with a specialization in career development. He is a licensed psychologist in the state of Florida (1982), a nationally certified counselor (1983) and a nationally certified coach (2010). Prior to joining the faculty at Florida State University, he was a Senior Counselor at the Student Counseling and Career Planning Center at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Since 1990s, Professor Sampson has cooperated closely with the University of Jyväskylä. The cooperation has been especially active with the guidance and counsellor education of the Department of Teacher Education, the Finnish Institute for Educational Research and the Open University. Sampson is a docent of the Finnish Institute for Educational Research. He has supervised several dissertations and has numerous joint publications with the researchers of the Faculty of Education and the Finnish Institute for Educational Research.

He makes annual teaching and research cooperation visits to Jyväskylä and has been part of a variety of webinars and a keynote speaker in the IAEVG conference in Jyväskylä in 2009. He also has collaborated closely with the management of the University of Jyväskylä.

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June 30, 2016

Career Center staff headshots

Dr. Janet Lenz

Dr. Janet G. Lenz, associate-in professor of educational psychology and learning systems and program director for career counseling, received the 2016 Eminent Career Award from the National Career Development Association (NCDA). This award is given for outstanding service to career development over a lifetime and is considered NCDA’s highest honor.

People who have eminent careers are those that have influenced either the practice of, or the thinking (theorizing) about career development through leadership activities or scholarship. Their careers are characterized by frequent, periodic, and sustained activities over a substantial period of time. Lenz also serves as program director for instruction, research, and evaluation at the FSU Career Center.
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Promotion & Tenure 2016

2015-2016 Promotion & Tenure Recipients

June 9, 2016

Congratulations to the following faculty members who received promotion and tenure:

Promotion to Specialized Teaching Faculty II
Ella-Mae Daniel, Elementary Education (STE)

Promotion to Specialized Teaching Faculty III
Dr. Angie Davis, Elementary Education (STE)

Promotion to Associate Professor
Dr. Tamara Bertrand Jones, Higher Education (ELPS)
Dr. Angela Canto, Psychology and Counseling Services (EPLS)
Dr. Bradley Cox, Higher Education (ELPS)
Dr. Insu Paek, Measurement and Statistics (EPLS)
Dr. Ryan Rodenberg, Sport Management (SM)

Tenure
Dr. Russell Almond, Measurement and Statistics (EPLS)
Dr. Tamara Bertrand Jones, Higher Education (ELPS)
Dr. Angela Canto, Psychology and Counseling Services (EPLS)
Dr. Bradley Cox, Higher Education (ELPS)
Dr. John Myers, Social Science Education (STE)
Dr. Insu Paek, Measurement and Statistics (EPLS)
Dr. Ryan Rodenberg, Sport Management (SM)

Promotion to Professor
Dr. Motoko Akiba, Educational Leadership and Policy (ELPS)
Dr. Vanessa Dennen, Instructional Systems and Learning Technologies (EPLS)

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May 26, 2016

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Cecile Reynaud

Dr. Cecile Reynaud, professor emerita in sport management, was honored with USA Volleyball’s Harold T. Friermood “Frier” Award, the highest honor bestowed by the national governing body, during the Dorothy C. Boyce Awards Recognition Banquet Wednesday evening in Orlando, Florida.

“Well obviously I have loved everything I have done for USA Volleyball and with the people in USA Volleyball,” Reynaud said. “This was quite shocking as you could tell by my expression. It is the highest honor you can receive by USA Volleyball. I am just so humble and grateful, and appreciate my opportunity to be involved in this sport. I have been fortunate to be asked to be involved in lot of roles in volleyball, and I have enjoyed all of them.”

Reynaud, who earned her Ph.D. in athletic administration from Florida State, served as a faculty member in Florida State’s sport management department from 2002-2015, helping to teach the next generation of sports executives.

Read more.
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May 11, 2016

Aubteen Darabi

Dr. Aubteen Darabi

A system developed at the Learning Systems Institute out of a $6.2-million grant awarded to Dr. Aubteen Darabi by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security has been nominated for a Lloyd’s List 2016 North America Award. This system, the PortStar project, is America’s only online & instructor-led training system on port security.

Lloyd’s List, one of the world’s oldest continuously running journals today, covers all information, analysis, and knowledge relevant to the shipping industry, including marine insurance, offshore energy, logistics, market data, research, global trade and law.

Dr. Darabi is an associate professor of Instructional Systems and Learning Technology and a senior research faculty at LSI. For his effort on this initiative, Dr. Darabi was also nominated for the 2009 Homeland Security Award presented by the Christopher Columbus Fellowship Foundation. In 2011, he received the Innovators Award from Florida State University for the advanced systemic features of this product that consolidated the fragmented national training and reporting efforts, and its contribution to the field.

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May 6, 2016

Ryan Rodenberg

Dr. Ryan Rodenberg

Dr. Ryan Rodenberg, assistant professor of sport management, was called to testify in Washington for a Congressional hearing looking into the daily fantasy sports industry. The hearing entitled, “Daily Fantasy Sports: Issues and Perspectives,” will take place on May 11, at 10:15 a.m. Rodenberg will appear in front of the House Subcommittee on Commerce, Manufacturing, and Trade.

Rodenberg is one of the foremost experts on federal law as it pertains to sports wagering; he has written an amicus brief in the ongoing New Jersey sports betting case. He will likely be consulted for his expertise on the applicable federal laws, namely UIGEA and PASPA.
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May 3, 2016

Dr. Brad Cox and Dr. Lara Perez-Felkner, assistant professors of higher education, were honored with the Faculty/Staff Mentor Award from the FSU Hardee Center. The award is based on student nominations.
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April 29, 2016

Below are the newly elected at-large reps for the College of Education Faculty Advisory Board (FAB) as well as current department representatives for next year.

At-Large Reps (2016-2018):
George Boggs, School of Teacher Education
Ella-Mae Daniel, School of Teacher Education
Brad Cox, Educational Leadership & Policy Studies
Tamara Bertrand Jones, Educational Leadership & Policy Studies

Department Reps (2015-2017):
Diana Rice, School of Teacher Education (Incoming Chair)
Amy Kim, Sport Management
Alysia Roehrig, Educational Psychology & Learning Systems
Courtney Preston, Educational Leadership & Policy Studies

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April 23, 2016

Dr. Jeffrey James, professor of sport management and department chair, was the featured speaker at the University of Massachusetts Amherst’s Mark H. McCormack Department of Sport Management Research Seminar Day. Dr. James spoke to students and faculty about the misinterpretation of team identification.

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April 22, 2016

John Myers, Teacher Education. He chose #3

Dr. John Myers

John Myers, associate professor of social science education, was awarded a University Undergraduate Teaching Award. The University Teaching Awards program recognizes faculty for excellence in undergraduate and graduate teaching. Recipients must be outstanding in the many aspects of teaching which contribute to successful teaching and learning. This is a student-oriented award with nominations submitted by students and alumni. Myers teaches a range of courses at both the undergraduate and graduate levels and collaborates on national and international projects in teacher education and professional development.

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Walter Dick, former professor in Instructional Systems and Learning Technologies, received the Thomas Gilbert Distinguished Professional Achievement Award from the International Society for Performance Improvement (ISPI). This award recognizes outstanding and significant contributions to the knowledge base of human performance technology.
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April 6, 2016

Graig Chow Photo

Dr. Graig Chow

Dr. Graig Chow, assistant professor of sport psychology, received the Faculty/Staff Seminole Award at the Division of Student Affairs’ Leadership Awards Night. This award is given to faculty and staff members who demonstrate an exemplary attitude toward students, are enthusiastic about working with students, and extend themselves to help students.

In his position as an Assistant Professor at FSU, Dr. Chow teaches courses in sport psychology, stress and performance, and group dynamics in sport. He is currently a member of the Association for Applied Sport Psychology and North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity.
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April 4, 2016

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Dr. Betsy Becker

Dr. Betsy Becker, professor of measurement and statistics and department chair of the Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems, was selected to receive a Distinguished Research Professor Award for 2015-2016.

The Distinguished Research Professor Awards recognize and reward outstanding career achievements in research and creative activity. Nominated by peers, Becker’s scholarly work was evaluated by a committee of Distinguished Research Professors.

Becker will be recognized at the Faculty Awards program on April 27th at the Alumni Center.

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April 1, 2016

Young-Suk Kim

Dr. Young-Suk Kim

Dr. Young-Suk Kim, associate professor of reading and language arts, received the 2016 Robert M. Gagné Outstanding Faculty Research Award. This award honors Robert M. Gagné’s research legacy and the spirit of mentoring with which he worked with
students and faculty colleagues. Kim’s primary research areas include language and literacy acquisition and instruction, including early literacy predictors, reading fluency, reading comprehension, and writing.

Read Kim’s research paper, Eye-movements in Oral and Silent Reading and Reading Proficiency for Beginning Readers.

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March 28, 2016

Ramos-Mattoussi Paredes-Drouet

Dr. Flavia Ramos-Mattoussi and Carla Paredes-Drouet, Ph.D. student in Education Policy and Evaluation.

Dr. Flavia Ramos-Mattoussi, senior research associate at the Learning Systems Institute (LSI), and a team of experts from LSI have received extended funding to continue work with officials and educators in Ethiopia to reform reading instruction in the African nation.

“This is a challenging project, because Ethiopia has one of the most inclusive policies on language of instruction, with more than 20 mother tongue languages being used in classrooms,” said Dr. Flavia Ramos-Mattoussi, the principal investigator and a senior research associate with the Center for International Studies in Educational Research & Development, part of the Learning Systems Institute.

Carla Paredes-Drouet is an early childhood education and development specialist with more than eight years of international experience who is assisting on the project. Paredes-Drouet, a native of Quito, Ecuador, is also a Ph.D. student in FSU’s Education Policy and Evaluation program.

“This project is designed to ensure that reading and writing skills are sufficiently developed in the primary school in the seven most widely spoken languages.” said Ramos-Mattoussi. “Our FSU team focuses on development of teacher education, curriculum and materials and on training of teacher educators.”

Learn more.
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March 21, 2016

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Dr. Steven Pfeiffer

Dr. Steven Pfeiffer, professor and director of clinical training, was extended an invitation by the Italian Parliament to come to Rome and testify on gifted education in the schools.

“Gifted education is not nearly as well-developed in Italy as it is here in the USA,” said Pfeiffer. “There are no policies or procedures for gifted education services or gifted identification in Italy.”

Members of the Italian Parliament who were familiar with Pfeiffer’s recent books and articles on gifted education heard about his work in Italy and across Europe, and thus invited him to speak in front of Parliament on April 27.

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March 18, 2016

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Dr. Carolyn Herrington

Dr. Carolyn Herrington, professor of educational policy, was honored with the Association for Education Finance and Policy‘s Outstanding Service Award. The Outstanding Service Award recognizes contributions made to public policy development, research, public understanding, local school finance development and service to the AEFP. The award is presented to each year’s winner at the AEFP Annual Conference.

“This is a great honor and a well-deserved one,” said Dr. Patrice Iatarola, associate professor of education policy and evaluation. “She joins an incredible list of previous recipients of the award.”
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March 4, 2016

Dr. Yaacov Petscher, researcher at the Florida Center for Reading Research (FCRR), has been chosen as an Outstanding Reviewer for 2015 for Educational Researcher (ER). Each year, AERA journal editors recognize the invaluable contribution of volunteer reviewers who have provided exemplary, thorough, and timely reviews of manuscripts received by their respective journals. Their service to the field is celebrated the following year at a reception hosted by the Journal Publications Committee during the AERA Annual Meeting.
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March 4, 2016

Dr. Beth Phillips

Dr. Beth Phillips, associate professor of educational psychology, has been chosen as an Outstanding Reviewer for 2015 for AERA Open. Each year, AERA journal editors recognize the invaluable contribution of volunteer reviewers who have provided exemplary, thorough, and timely reviews of manuscripts received by their respective journals. Their service to the field is celebrated the following year at a reception hosted by the Journal Publications Committee during the AERA Annual Meeting.

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February 29, 2016

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Dr. Stephanie Simmons Zuilkowski

Dr. Stephanie Zuilkowski, assistant professor of comparative education and international development, received the CIES Joyce Cain Award for Distinguished Research on people of African descent. Zuilkowski holds a joint appointment in the College of Education and the Learning Systems Institute (LSI).

The society gave Dr. Zuilkowski its Joyce Cain Award for Distinguished Research for her paper in the August 2014 edition of Comparative Education Review. Her paper examines the impact of two categories of post-war interventions on dropout among more than 500 boys and girls who fought in Sierra Leone’s civil war. More than 15,000 child soldiers were involved in the war, which divided the West African nation from 1991 to 2002.

Read more via LSI at http://fla.st/1QYuwSL.
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February 24, 2016

Kristal Clemons

Dr. Kristal Clemons

Dr. Kristal Clemons, assistant professor and director of FSUCOE’s online Ed.D. program in Educational Leadership and Policy, spoke with FAMU Now! correspondent, Travis Milton, about the efforts of the female teachers of the Mississippi Freedom Schools in 1964. Clemons is also an alumna of the FSU College of Education. In addition, she is a co-executive director of North Florida Freedom Schools (NFFS), a new nonprofit co-sponsored by Florida State University and Florida A&M University, that has been selected by the Children’s Defense Fund (CDF) to operate two CDF Freedom School six-week summer program sites.
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February 18, 2016

Dr. George Boggs, assistant professor of English education, was featured in the FSU Sustainable Campus January/February 2016 newsletter. Young men from the Leon County Schools’ gang prevention program, 50 LARGE, work with Boggs on his family farm growing food and cultivating a lifestyle of respect and sustainability. Read more on page 7 below.

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February 18, 2016

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Dr. Jane Lo

Dr. Jane Lo, assistant professor of social science education, has been invited to be a fellow in the Florida Joint Center for Citizenship, a research-based group investigating citizenship. The Joint Center grew from a 2006 bipartisan effort, launched by Congressman Lou Frey and Senator Bob Graham, to improve civic education in Florida. Lo’s research focuses on the political engagement of youth, social studies curriculum development, and developing measures of deep learning and collaboration. Her methodological expertise includes mixed-methods designs, design-based implementation research, interview and survey methods, and advanced correlational techniques. She teaches courses in social studies methods.
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February 15, 2016

Herrington

Dr. Carolyn Herrington

Dr. Carolyn Herrington, professor of educational policy, was named an American Educational Research Association (AERA) Fellow. The purpose of the AERA Fellows Program is to honor education researchers with substantial research accomplishments, to convey the Association’s commitment to excellence in research, and to enable the next generation of emerging scholars to appreciate the value of sustained achievements in research and the breadth of scholarship worthy of recognition.

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February 12, 2016

David-Tandberg

Dr. David Tandberg

An article written by Dr. David Tandberg, Nicholas Hillman, and Alisa Fryar was the second most accessed journal article in Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis (EEPA) in 2015. “Evaluating the Impacts of ‘New’ Performance Funding in Higher Education” describes new research found that state higher education performance funding falls short of its intended goals of raising student retention and degree completion rates at community colleges. Tandberg is an associate professor of higher education in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. Click here to see the complete list of most read education research articles.
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February 11, 2016

Dr. Steven Pfeiffer, professor and director of Clinical Training in the Counseling Psychology and School Psychology combined Ph.D. program, spoke about gifted education and talent development in an interview with Javier Tourón in Spain. Tourón is vice chancellor for innovation and educational development at Universidad Internacional de La Rioja-UNIR.

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February 3, 2016

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Dr. Ithel Jones

Dr. Ithel Jones, professor in the School of Teacher Education, conducted an independent evaluation of the MBF Child Safety Matters Program from January through June 2015. The purpose of the evaluation was to determine the overall effectiveness of the MBF Child Safety Matters Program in Florida. The study also sought to identify factors that contributed to helping or hindering change, and draw lessons for future programming.

Click here to view the research summary.
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February 2, 2016

Thanks to the collaborative effort of several College of Education faculty and alumni, a hundred local children will have access to learning programs aimed at curbing summer learning loss and closing achievement gaps. The group will help provide an opportunity for children in Leon and Gadsden counties to participate in quality summer enrichment programs.

North Florida Freedom Schools (NFFS), a new nonprofit co-sponsored by Florida State University and Florida A&M University, has been selected by the Children’s Defense Fund (CDF) to operate two CDF Freedom School six-week summer program sites from June 13 to July 22.

Dr. Alysia Roehrig

“The goal is to empower K-12 students in low socioeconomic status communities to make a difference through civic action projects, while also staving off summer reading loss using a culturally responsive reading curriculum,” said Dr. Alysia Roehrig, NFFS research director and associate professor of educational psychology at Florida State.

Students who participate in the camps will have the chance to take part in diverse afternoon activities supported by organizations in the community, such as the Institute for Research in Music and Entertainment Industry Studies at FAMU, Florida State University’s Center for Sport, Health and Equitable Development, TITUS Sports Academy and the REAL Life Student Program. The students will receive free summer learning opportunities and free meals.

The summer camp teachers, who will be undergraduate students or recent graduates, will have the opportunity to learn about critical teaching techniques.

They also will have mentoring opportunities to learn about the strengths of diverse students and gain experience in conducting research in education.

Faculty will conduct studies with camp participants and their parents to assess their needs and improve the program.

Florida State Associate Professor Joshua I. Newman and Assistant Professors George L. Boggs and Graig M. Chow, along with FSU alumnae Tricia James and Sheila LaBissiere are part of the project team.

Read the full article here.
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January 21, 2016

White House Convening edit

Drs. Tandberg, Hu, and Park

On Wednesday, January 20th, three faculty members in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies attended the Education Scholars Convening on Community College Research at the White House: Dr. Shouping Hu, professor of higher education; Dr. Toby Park, assistant professor of economics of education and education policy; and Dr. David Tandberg, associate professor of higher education.

The meeting, which discussed research on strengthening community colleges and expanding college opportunities for students, included remarks from senior officials from the White House Domestic Policy Council, White House Council of Economic Advisers, and the U.S. Department of Education.

Drs. Hu, Park, and Tandberg are well known for their research with community colleges. In addition to serving as faculty in the FSU College of Education, Hu is founder and director of the Center for Postsecondary Success at Florida State University, with Park and Tandberg serving as associate directors.

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January 20, 2016

Dr. Jim Sampson

The faculties of the University of Jyväskylä in Finland will award Dr. James P. Sampson, associate dean for faculty development, an honorary doctorate in the faculty of education.

The faculties of the University award honorary doctorates to persons with meritorious work for the benefit of society or science. They will award 13 new honorary doctorates in total. Sampson is one of only two to receive the doctorate in the faculty of education.

The ninth Conferment of Degrees Ceremony for the whole University and the conferment procession will be held on Saturday, 13 August 2016.
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January 12, 2016

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Dr. Lara Perez-Felkner

Dr. Lara Perez-Felkner, assistant professor of higher education and sociology, was featured in Florida State University’s first “A Day in the Life” series for Careers in Student Affairs Month. Perez-Felkner discusses her role as one of the most junior faculty members in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, as well as her path to this profession.

View Perez-Felkner’s story on page 11.

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January 5, 2016

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Dr. Stacy Rutledge

Dr. Stacy Rutledge‘s collaborative work with Lora Cohen-Vogel, La’Tara Osborne-Lampkin, and Ronnie L. Robertson on personalization in high schools was published in the American Educational Research Journal (AERA). “Understanding Effective High Schools Evidence for Personalization for Academic and Social Emotional Learning” presents findings from a year-long multilevel comparative case study exploring the characteristics of effective urban high schools. Rutledge is an associate professor in the Educational Leadership and Educational Policy and Evaluation.

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Dr. Joshua Newman

January 5, 2016

Dr. Joshua Newman, associate professor in sport management, was featured in Wallet Hub’s recent article about the best and worst cities for an active lifestyle in 2016. Newman, who is also associate chair of the Department of Sport Management and director of the Center for Sport, Health, & Equitable Development at FSU, shares his advice on introducing positive changes both at home and on the policy level.

Click here to read the article.
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December 14, 2015

Dr. Alysia Roehrig

Dr. Alysia Roehrig, associate professor of educational psychology, was a recipient of the Marvalene Hughes Research Incentive Grant to conduct research on problems related to black males in education. At the Council on Research in Education (CORE)’s Marvalene Hughes Research in Education Conference this past spring, Marvalene Hughes challenged the College of Education’s faculty and students to conduct research on problems related to black males in education, and in turn, generously provided funding to help support this initiative. Using these funds, the College created the Marvalene Hughes Research Incentive Grant. Roehrig will present preliminary results of her research at next year’s conference in the College of Education on April 1, 2016. For more information about CORE, visit http://education.fsu.edu/research/core.
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December 14, 2015

Dr. George Boggs

Dr. George Boggs, assistant professor of English education, was a recipient of the Marvalene Hughes Research Incentive Grant to conduct research on problems related to black males in education. At the Council on Research in Education (CORE)’s Marvalene Hughes Research in Education Conference this past spring, Marvalene Hughes challenged the College of Education’s faculty and students to conduct research on problems related to black males in education, and in turn, generously provided funding to help support this initiative. Using these funds, the College created the Marvalene Hughes Research Incentive Grant. Boggs will present preliminary results of his research at next year’s conference in the College of Education on April 1, 2016. For more information about CORE, visit http://education.fsu.edu/research/core.
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December 11, 2015

Courtney Preston 3

Dr. Courtney Preston

Dr. Courtney Preston, assistant professor of educational leadership and policy, has been featured in TCRecord for her work on quality instruction in urban high schools.

Background/Context: High schools are under increasing pressure to move beyond just graduating students, and many high schools today continue to have low rates of student retention and learning, particularly for students from traditionally low-performing subgroups. Differential dropout rates, wherein low-income students, minorities, and English language learners leave school at higher rates than other students, only compound the problem.

Purpose/Objective: In this study, we examine differences in instructional quality between two higher and two lower value-added high schools, as measured by the Classroom Assessment Scoring System – Secondary (CLASS-S). It explores (a) differences in levels of instructional quality, (b) differences in the proportions of students taking advanced courses, and (c) differences in the way teachers think and talk about their classroom challenges.

Click here to read the article.
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December 10, 2015

Toby-Park

Dr. Toby Park

Dr. Toby Park, assistant professor of the economics of education and education policy, was published in TCRecord for his research exploring the relationship between full-time community college enrollment and the transfer to a 4 year university.

Background/Context: Recent developments in state-level policy have begun to require, incentivize, and/or encourage students at community colleges to enroll full time in an effort to increase the likelihood that students will persist and transfer to four-year institution where they will be able to complete their bachelor’s degree. Often, these policies are predicated on the idea that full-time status is associated with greater engagement on behalf of the student, a concept that has been widely studied in higher education as it relates to student persistence and degree attainment.

Purpose: Building upon theory and observational studies, I seek to empirically test whether enrolling full time at a community college has a discernible effect on transferring to a four-year university.

Click here to read the article.
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December 9, 2015

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Dr. Shouping Hu

Dr. Shouping Hu, professor of higher education and Center for Postsecondary Success director, was published in the Journal of Higher Education for his work on the effects of Florida’s Bright Futures program.

Abstract: This study evaluates the effect of Florida’s Bright Future Program on student college choices. We used regression discontinuity design to estimate the effect of two award levels, which had different SAT/ACT thresholds, on the probability of students choosing instate public colleges and four-year public colleges. The most consistent and robust finding was the positive, significant increases in the probability of attending Florida’s public colleges and in the probability of choosing four-year public colleges for those students who barely met the program eligibility criteria when compared with those who barely missed those criteria. That is, the evidence presented in this analysis points to the fact that the Bright Future programs significantly altered students’ college choices, both in terms of attending in-state public colleges and four-year public colleges. Although this finding held at different award levels and for students who took the SAT and/or ACT tests, the magnitude of the program effect varied along these factors.

Click here to read the article.
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November 9, 2015

Laura-Osteen

Dr. Laura Osteen

Dr. Laura Osteen, director of the Florida State University Center for Leadership and Social Change and faculty member in the Higher Education program, received the Woman in Higher Education Achievement Award from the National Panhellenic Conference (NPC).

This award promotes values and ethics in women’s sororities and recognizes an outstanding woman who is making a significant difference in higher education through leadership and positive support of the fraternity and sorority experience. Osteen was recognized for going above and beyond the call of duty.

NPC is one of the largest advocacy groups for women and serves 26 national and international sororities. NPC sororities are located on more than 672 campuses with 353,345 undergraduate members involved with 3,184 sororities.
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November 7, 2015

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Dr. David Tandberg (L) and Dr. Toby Park (R)

A study on presidential salaries and fundraising was covered by The Chronicle of Higher Education. The new study on executive pay and fundraising at public colleges was conducted by three FSU College of Education scholars: James M. Hunt, a doctoral candidate in educational leadership and policy studies; Dr. Toby J. Park, an assistant professor of the economics of education and education policy; and Dr. David A. Tandberg, an associate professor of higher education.

View the article: “High Pay for Presidents Is Not Shown to Yield Any Fund-Raising Payoff.”

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November 2, 2015

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Dr. Kathy Guthrie

Dr. Kathy Guthrie, an associate professor of Higher Education in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, was nominated for a Transformation Through Teaching award. Transformation Through Teaching is a program established through the Spiritual Life Project to honor full-time faculty that have had an intellectual, inspirational, and integrative impact on the lives of their students.

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November 2, 2015

Vanessa Dennen

Dr. Vanessa Dennen

Dr. Vanessa Dennen, associate professor of Instructional Systems and Learning Technologies, was nominated for a Transformation Through Teaching award. Transformation Through Teaching is a program established through the Spiritual Life Project to honor full-time faculty that have had an intellectual, inspirational, and integrative impact on the lives of their students.

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November 2, 2015

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Dr. Deb Osborn

Dr. Debra Osborn, associate professor of Psychological and Counseling Services, was nominated for a Transformation Through Teaching award. Transformation Through Teaching is a program established through the Spiritual Life Project to honor full-time faculty that have had an intellectual, inspirational, and integrative impact on the lives of their students.

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October 27, 2015

Roger Kaufman

Dr. Roger Kaufman

Dr. Roger Kaufman, emeritus professor of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems, gave the invited keynote address, “Assuring the Future Value of HRD,” at the Korean International Human Resources Development Conferencee, Seoul, Korea, Sept. 15; gave the keynote address, “Talent Development as the Base for Assuring the Future for Organizations,” at the 3rd International Symposium on the Emerging Trends in Strategic Talent Development at the Talent Development Institute for Local Government, Taichung, Taiwan, Aug. 12-13.
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Dawn Matthews

Dawn Matthews

October 25, 2015

A group of Advising First staff members made presentations at the national conference of the National Association of Academic Advising in Las Vegas. Dawn Matthews, academic support coordinator and mapping coordinator in the College of Education, presented with Caitlin Tidwell and Brooke Taddonio, “Re-Defining Global Citizenship: A Guide for Advising and Supporting International Students.”

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October 22, 2015

Michael Giardina

Dr. Michael Giardina

Dr. Michael Giardina, associate professor of Sport Management, along with FSU Sport Management doctoral student Amber Wiest and Dr. David Andrews (University of Maryland), published a journal article titled “Training the Body for Healthism: Reifying Vitality In and Through the Clinical Gaze of the Neoliberal Fitness Club” in Review of Education, Pedagogy, & Cultural Studies. In the article, they examine institutional practices and conceptions of health within the for-profit fitness industry (especially personal training practices) to illuminate the power relations implicated in (and operating through) the promotion of ‘health’ as a condition to be achieved by the morally responsible citizen (i.e., the fitness club member).

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October 12, 2015

Dr. Steven Pfeiffer

Dr. Steven Pfeiffer, professor and director of Clinical Training in the Counseling Psychology and School Psychology combined Ph.D. program, has been featured in The Creativity Post. In the article, he shares two lessons that he has learned in his work with gifted and creative kids. The first lesson is that talent development among gifted kids requires more than high intelligence. The second lesson is that success in adult life requires both head strengths and heart strengths.

Click here to view the article.

You can also read Dr. Pfeiffer’s interview with Education Views.
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October 8, 2015

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Dr. Jeffrey James

Mode L. Stone Distinguished Professor of Sport Management and Department Chair, Dr. Jeffrey James, was the winner of the 2015 David K. Stotlar Award.

Awarded by the Sport Marketing Association, the David K. Stotlar Award honors an academician who makes exceptional contributions to sport marketing education in one or more of the following areas:

  • Possesses an established record of mentoring PhD students
  • Has served as an advocate to doctoral students at his or her institution as well as on a national and/or international level
  • Has demonstrated a commitment to the professional development of his or her advisees
  • Has contributed to the growth of a graduate level sport marketing curriculum at one or more institutions

Dr. James will be presented with this award at the SMA Awards Luncheon on Friday, October 30.
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October 3, 2015

Dr. George Boggs, assistant professor of English education, shared his work with 50 LARGE on WFSU for American Graduate Day. Boggs operates Good Taste Tally out of his own home, where his four young children and three high school students in the 50 Large program participate in hands-on learning through farming. They not only learn about raising crops (biology), but they make business decisions to keep the farm sustainable.

Click below to view the video.

Good Taste Tally

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September 24, 2015

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Dr. Marty Swanbrow Becker

September is Suicide Prevention Awareness Month and Florida State University is taking strides to increase awareness and prevention on campus. Dr. Marty Swanbrow Becker, assistant professor of psychological and counseling services, is the principal investigator on the Noles CARE in Academics project, which will expand suicide prevention training and make suicide prevention resources more available to the campus community.

The project emerged as a collaborative effort from the FSU Healthy Campus 2020 Mental Health Team and the need to improve the suicide prevention resources within FSU academic departments. The goal is to increase the percentage of faculty, staff and students who feel competent identifying and intervening with individuals in distress. View Dr. Swanbrow Becker’s FSU press release and WFSU interview.
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September 15, 2015

Damelio

Click the photo to view the video

Every fall semester, Mickey Damelio educates students about what it’s like to be visually impaired in his Blindness Experience class. Damelio, teaching faculty in visual disabilities, created this class in 2011 to provide a public service to the Florida State University community. A representative for USA Today College, Daniella Abinum, shadowed Damelio’s class and wrote about her experiences in a recent article.

Damelio was also featured in a USA Today College article discussing how students who are blind face greater social challenges on campus.

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September 15, 2015

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Dr. Lara Perez-Felkner

A new research study by Dr. Lara Perez-Felkner, assistant professor of higher education and sociology and senior research associate at Florida State’s Center for Postsecondary Success (CPS), has found that social support in schools is key to student success.

Perez-Felkner, using a case study of a predominantly Latino and low-income urban charter school, found that students observe and value support from teachers and peers, embedded within the school’s social context. Collectively, highly structured support networks appear to have a positive effect on student’s college transition outcomes.

The three-year study, which was published in the journal Teachers College Record analyzed the variation in students’ educational pathways to college by specifically asking “How can the social context of schools keep underrepresented minority students on track to transition to college?”

Click here to read the press release.

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September 10, 2015

Rodenberg

Dr. Ryan Rodenberg

Dr. Ryan Rodenberg, assistant professor in the Department of Sport Management, contributed to a New York Times article on how the Bryan Brothers fought against rule changes that would have phased out doubles specialists in tennis.

How the Bryan Brothers Saved Doubles,” written by Douglas Robson with contributing reports by Dr. Rodenberg, examines how a lawsuit filed by the Bryan brothers against the ATP Tour has affected doubles in tennis nearly ten years later.

Rodenberg’s research focuses primarily on sports law analytics. In his position as assistant professor, Dr. Rodenberg teaches Sport Law. Reprints of his work are available at his website (www.sportslawprofessor.com) and SSRN.

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September 10, 2015

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Dr. Kathy Clark

Dr. Kathy Clark, associate professor of mathematics education, has been featured in an Education Week article about an NSF-funded project that she is working on.

Under a $1.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation, Clark and six other university math professors are writing lesson plans around primary sources which they’ll then pilot with students around the country. While this is a common practice in history and English classes, it is rare in the math world. The idea, based on earlier grant-funded work, is that understanding the origins of important mathematical concepts will help students fully grasp and remember them later, and that exploring mathematicians’ motivations will be inspiring for students.

For Clark, who is a principal investigator, the project is about enhancing students’ ability to build their own mathematical arguments. Students who are learning Pascal’s triangle and “have gone through the words of the actual authority from 1654, when they go to work on problems based on that mathematical concept, we hope their articulation will be more nuanced because they’ve had this rich experience,” she told Education Week.

Before Clark was a faculty member in the FSU College of Education, she taught high school for 12 years. In her work as a high school math teacher, she periodically used primary sources with her students and found them beneficial. “That’s a missed resource in high school teaching today,” she said. “I hardly see math students in high school open a book for anything other than math exercises. It perpetuates this notion that math is just a bunch of exercises you do—you crunch numbers and solve for x.” Through primary sources, students learn to “tear apart the mathematics and the meaning and put it together at the end.”

To read the full article by Education Week, click here.

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August 20, 2015

Dr. Lara Perez-Felkner, assistant professor of higher education and sociology and senior research associate at the Center for Postsecondary Success, spoke to WTXL Tallahassee about her recent research studies in an interview.

One study that she conducted alongside Samantha Nix and Kirby Thomas found that women remain to be under represented in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math fields.

The interview focused on bridging the gender gap in STEM careers and suggested ways to get more women involved in STEM. Click the picture below to view Dr. Perez-Felkner’s interview with Kellie Bartoli of WTXL.

LPF interview

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July 30, 2015

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Dr. Stephanie Zuilkowski

Dr. Stephanie Simmons Zuilkowski is the winner of the 2014 BJEP Early Stage Career Researcher Prize for her paper, Early childhood malaria prevention and children’s patterns of school leaving in the Gambia, published in the September 2014 issue of the British Journal of Educational Psychology (BJEP).

Zuilkowski is an assistant professor of comparative education and international development in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies and holds a joint appointment with the Center for International Studies in Education Research and Development (CISERD) in the Learning Systems Institute (LSI).

Read more at Florida State 24/7

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July 27, 2015

Dr. Valerie Shute

Dr. Val Shute, Mack and Effie Campbell Tyner Endowed Professor in Education in the Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems, will share her research and insights at the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) 2015 Research Conference in Melbourne, Australia. Presenters at Research Conference 2015 will share advances in the use of assessment for informed decision making by teachers, students, parents, school leaders, system managers and governments.

Shute will present her work on stealth assessment and video games, particularly how video games can help teach physics, persistence and creativity. She will also provide examples within the context of a game that she designed and developed with her team called Physics Playground.

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July 16, 2015

Dr. Lara Perez-Felkner

A research brief co-written by Dr. Lara Perez-Felkner has been featured in Teachers College Record. The brief, “Does the Gender Gap in STEM Majors Vary by Field and Institutional Selectivity?” examines the gender gap in specific STEM majors among college sophomores and whether this gap varies across institutions of different selectivity. Click here to view the full article.

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July 8, 2015

Dr. Joshua Newman and Dr. Michael Giardina, associate professors of sport management, have been quoted in the media regarding sports and society. Click below to view the stories:

“Sports could be leader in societal change; it just rarely chooses to be”

“U.S. Ranks Worst in Sports Homophobia Study”

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June 24, 2015

2014-2015 FSU Council for Research and Creativity (CRC) Awards

Committee on Faculty Research Support (COFRS) Award:
Dr. Martin Swanbrow Becker, Assistant Professor of Psychological and Counseling Services
Dr. David Tandberg, Assistant Professor of Higher Education
Dr. Toby Park, Assistant Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy

First Year Assistant Professor (FYAP) Award:
Dr. Graig Chow, Assistant Professor of Sports Psychology
Dr. Shelley Krach, Assistant Professor of Psychological and Counseling Services
Dr. Sarah Ivy, Assistant Professor of Visual Disabilities
Dr. Wenxia Wang, Assistant Professor of Foreign and Second Language Education
Dr. Courtney Preston, Assistant Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy

Planning Grant (PG) Award:
Dr. Shelbie Witte, Associate Professor of English Education

COE Grant Competition
Dr. Brad Cox, Assistant Professor of Higher Education
Dr. Martin Swanbrow Becker, Assistant Professor of Psychological and Counseling Services

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June 23, 2015

Dr. David Tandberg
, assistant professor of higher education, has been quoted in a CNBC article pertaining to states grading public colleges on performance. “It’s great to see our work getting good media coverage,” said Dean Marcy Driscoll.

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June 17 2015

Dr. Josh Newman

Dr. Joshua Newman, associate professor of sport management, is taking ten graduate students in the Sport Management program to the Doha GOALS Forum in Los Angeles in July. Doha GOALS is the world’s premier platform for world leaders to create initiatives for global progress through sport. Rather than acting as a conference – where ideas are traded but rarely enacted – Doha GOALS is an initiative with the express intent of empowering stakeholders to create a roadmap for social improvement through sports, and launch cross-border initiatives. It is put on by the government of Qatar.

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June 10, 2015

Dr. Lara Perez-Felkner

Dr. Lara Perez-Felkner, assistant professor of higher education and sociology, has been receiving local and national attention for a recent study she co-authored that was published in Frontiers in Psychology. Lead author of the study was one of the College of Education’s doctoral students, Samantha Nix [see Student News].

The study, “Perceived mathematical ability under challenge: a longitudinal perspective on sex segregation among STEM degree fields,” examined why some students shun math-intensive fields. Nix, Perez-Felkner, and sociology doctoral student, Kirby Thomas, investigated how perceived ability under challenge—in particular in mathematics domains—influences entry into the most sex-segregated and mathematics-intensive undergraduate degrees: physics, engineering, mathematics, and computer science (PEMC).

The study was featured in the Tallahassee Democrat, Motherboard, The Conversation, and Phys.org.

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June 9, 2015

Dr. Ian Whitacre

Dr. Ian Whitacre, assistant professor of mathematics education, has received a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF). He is Co-PI on a project with University of Colorado faculty, “Teaching and Learning Algebraic Thinking Across the Middle Grades: A Research-based Approach Using PhET Interactive Simulations.”

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June 8, 2015

Dr. George Boggs

Dr. George Boggs, assistant professor of English education, has been featured in locally in several news outlets regarding his work with 50 LARGE, a gang prevention initiative by Leon County Schools. A year ago, Boggs and select participants of 50 LARGE began cultivating the land into a fully functioning farm. Through the project, participants are developing skills in marketing, STEM fields and interpersonal communication. In March, 50 LARGE sold produce they had planted, tended, picked, packaged and priced at the opening of the Frenchtown Heritage Market.

Boggs has been featured in the Florida State 24/7, the Tallahassee Democrat, and even on WTXL’s 5 o’clock news for his real world approach to literacy and work with the community.

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June 3, 2015

Dr. James P. Sampson, Dr. Janet G. Lenz, Dr. Gary W. Peterson, Dr. Robert C. Reardon, and V. Casey Dozier co-wrote an article, “The Impact of the Self-Directed Search Form R Internet Version on Counselor-free Career Exploration,” which was published in the Journal of Career Assessment, May 2015.

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May 1, 2015

DSC_3681

Mickey Damelio

Mickey Damelio, teaching faculty in visual disabilities, and two visual disabilities graduate students will be teaching students and helping to train school employees at The Salvation Army School for the Blind in Kingston, Jamaica, this May. Damelio will be there for the entire month of May while the two students will be there for about a week.

“Maddie and Elizabeth will have a life changing experience working with children in the school for the blind, and I’ll appreciate the assistance while they are there!” said Damelio.

For more information, click here.

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April 16, 2015

David-Tandberg

David Tandberg

Dr. David Tandberg has been promoted to associate professor with tenure, effective August 2015. Congratulations Dr. Tandberg!

Dr. Tandberg is currently an assistant professor of higher education and associate director of the Center for Postsecondary Success at Florida State University. His teaching and research interest center on state higher education policy and politics. He is particularly interested in the political antecedents of state higher education policy and finance decisions. Dr. Tandberg is also interested in broader issues involving state higher education finance, governance and economics. His research has appeared in “Research in Higher Education”, “Educational Policy” and “Higher Education in Review.”

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April 13, 2015

College of Education faculty and staff headshots. Shelbie Witte

Shelbie Witte

Dr. Shelbie Witte has been appointed to the editorship of NCTE’s Voices from the Middle, which offers articles on research and best practices in middle level reading, writing, speaking, and listening in the visual and language arts. The journal’s mission is to be the cornerstone for the ongoing professional development of language arts educators.  Dr. Witte will share this role with Dr. Sara Kajder of the University of Georgia.

“This is a great honor and even greater responsibility, but I know Shelbie is up to the challenge,” said Dr. Sherry Southerland, interim director in the School of Teacher Education.

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April 13, 2015

John Myers, Teacher Education. He chose #3

John Myers

Dr. John Myers, associate professor of social science education, has been selected as the Guardian of the Flame Faculty Award winner for the College of Education. Members of Burning Spear, Inc., a student body organization, recognize faculty members across campus who have made a difference in advancing FSU as a leading higher education institution.

Burning Spear is a not-for-profit corporation consisting of diverse current or former student leaders and engaged alumni who actively participate in supporting university goals and helping others to do the same. The Guardian of the Flame Faculty Award is the only faculty recognition award chosen by the FSU student body.

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April 11, 2015

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Dr. Debra Osborn

Congratulations to Dr. Debra Osborn, associate professor of psychological and counseling services, for receiving the 2015 Robert M. Gagné Research Award. This award honors Gagné’s research legacy and the spirit of mentoring with which he worked with students and faculty colleagues. This is the highest research honor at the FSU College of Education.

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April 10, 2015

Ella-Mae Daniel, visiting faculty and assistant instructor in elementary education, has received a Faculty Fellows Program grant from the Office of Critical Thinking Initiatives and the Office of the Provost. These 2015 grants support FSU’s Quality Enhancement Plan ThinkFSU.

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April 2, 2015

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Dr. Valerie Shute

Congratulations to Dr. Valerie Shute, professor of instructional systems and learning technologies, who has been selected to receive a 2015 Graduate Student Mentor Award. Each year, the FSU Graduate School recognizes faculty members for their outstanding mentoring of students. Dr. Shute will be honored for this outstanding achievements at the Celebration of Graduate Student Excellence on Wednesday, April 8, 2015 at 3:30pm in the FSU Alumni Center.

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March 31, 2015

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Dr. Jeanne Wanzek

Dr. Jeanne Wanzek, associate professor of special education and researcher at The Florida Center for Reading Research, has been selected to receive a Developing Scholar Award by the Council on Research and Creativity. Developing Scholar Awards are given to mid-career, associate professor level faculty to support their research programs through a one-time award of $10,000 for research expenses. Wanzek, who was nominated by peers, will be honored on April 27, 2015. You can read more about Wanzek’s recognition here.

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March 11, 2015

The ACPA Collaborative Excellence Award for On-Going Partnership was awarded to the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies for their collaborative work with the Undergraduate Certificate in Leadership Studies and The Center for Leadership and Social Change. Dr. Kathy Guthrie, associate professor of higher education and coordinator of the Undergraduate Certificate in Leadership Studies, accepted the award on behalf of the two.

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March 4, 2015

Helen Boyle

Dr. Helen Boyle

Dr. Helen Boyle, associate professor of international and comparative education and Learning Systems Institute faculty member, will present her research on the changing nature of Islamic education in West Africa at the annual conference of the Comparative and International Education Society next week in Washington, D.C.

Click here to read more.

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March 3, 2015

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Dr. Flavia Ramos-Mattoussi

Dr. Flavia Ramos-Mattoussi, senior research associate at the Learning Systems Institute, will lead a panel of Florida State University experts in a discussion of reading education in Ethiopia and the challenges faced by educators in this nation of many languages at the annual conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, March 8-13 in Washington.

Click here to read more.

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February 28, 2015

Dr. Fengfeng Ke, associate professor in the Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems, and Dr. Lara Perez-Felkner, assistant professor of higher education and sociology in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, have been appointed new senior research associates for the Center for Postsecondary Success.

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February 25, 2015

College of Education faculty and staff headshots

Dr. Deborah Reed

A proposal by Dr. Deborah Reed, assistant professor of special education in the Florida State University School of Teacher Education and the The Florida Center for Reading Research, has been elected by the American Educational Research Association (AERA)’s Education Research Service Project Initiative for funding.

Click here to read more.

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February 24, 2015

College of Education faculty members.

Dr. Fengfeng Ke

The International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning has accepted a conference paper written by Dr. Fengfeng Ke examining the space flight simulator instructional system (SFIS) developed by the Science Department at Florida State University Schools (FSUS). Dr. Ke is an associate professor in the Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems.

Click here to read more.

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February 12, 2015

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Dr. Bob Reiser

Associate Dean for Research and Robert M. Morgan Professor of Instructional Systems Robert Reiser was featured in A Way with Words, a public radio program about language examined through history, culture, and family. The radio interview initially broadcasted on October 26, 2013 and was recently rebroadcasted on January 24, 2015 on NPR. Dr. Reiser discusses student writing feedback and how he is “tired of writing the same comments over and over on student papers.”

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February 11, 2015

College of Education faculty and staff headshots. Vanessa Dennen

Dr. Vanessa Dennen

Dr. Vanessa P. Dennen, associate professor of instructional systems & learning technologies, has been appointed editor-in-chief of The Internet and Higher Education, a quarterly journal published by Elsevier. The journal is ranked in the top 20 in its subject category, Education and Educational Research, in the Social Sciences Citation Index. Dennen previously served as associate editor for the journal.

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January 9, 2015

College of Education faculty and staff.

Dr. Debra Osborn

Deb Osborn, associate professor of psychological and counseling services, and three doctoral students in the Counseling Psychology and School Psychology Combined PhD program co-wrote a paper titled, “Technology-savvy Career Counseling.” 

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January 5, 2015

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Dr. Kathy Clark

Dr. Kathy Clark, associate professor of mathematics education, was awarded a two-month “Comenius Professorship” at the University of Siegen in Germany. She will be conducting a study on the transition problem from school to university mathematics and will give a lecture on her work to the whole campus along with a one-week workshop for graduate students.

The study will involve 20 pre-service secondary mathematics teachers in Germany, during their own study of mathematics, as they prepare for teaching. They will look at the transition from studying mathematics in K-12 schools to studying mathematics at the university.

“The key activity in the research is an intensive seminar course, in which we help the mathematics students confront their own views on mathematics, and then use original sources to investigate the development of a branch of mathematics, geometry in our case,” says Clark. “By doing so, we hope to make two conflicting views of mathematics (empirical view and formalist view) explicit, and then use history of mathematics as a way to mediate the ‘abstract shock’ that is often experienced by university mathematics majors.”

Clark’s professorship will begin in February 2015.

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December 8, 2014

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Mickey Damelio

Mickey Damelio, teaching faculty and orientation and mobility coordinator in visual disabilities, was elected chair of the board of directors of the Academy for Certification of Vision Rehabilitation & Education Professionals (ACVREP), the international certifying body for most vision impairment professionals in this part of the world. Damelio previously held the position of vice chair.

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November 26, 2014

via isfsu.blogspot.com

College of Education faculty and staff.

Dr. Aubteen Darabi

Dr. Aubteen Darabi, associate professor of instructional systems, will play a major instructional design role in a multi-million dollar project aimed at realigning Philippine’s Universities’ engineering curricula with the needs of industry and business.

Research Triangle International was the recipient of a $32 million grant from the US Agency for International Development aimed at Science, Technology, Research, and Innovation Development (STRIDE). Among the collaborating universities for securing this grant, the FSU’s Learning System Institutes (LSI) received $1.4 million of funding to improve the Philippines’ workforce development initiatives and realign their universities’ engineering curricula to be more responsive to the industry needs.

As the co-PI of this project, Dr. Darabi is leading the project’s instructional design efforts, the results of which will feed into the establishment of a Professional Science Master’s Degree. Dr. Jeff Milligan of LSI, the PI of the project, and other faculty from FSU are leading the workforce development efforts and establishment of career centers across Philippines.

This fall, Dr. Darabi visited four of the major universities in Manila and introduced the engineering deans, chairs, and teaching faculty to the concepts and principles of Human Performance Technology (HPT) and the Instructional Systems and presented a framework for this initiative. Three of the universities agreed to participate in the project: De La Salle University, Technological Institute of the Philippines, and Ateneo de Manila University.

Between now and his next visit in March of 2016, Dr. Darabi will be working with the faculty and administrators of the participating universities to identify and analyze programs’ courses, competencies, learning and performance objectives, instructional strategies and sequence of the course content as currently offered. In March 2015, Darabi will revisit the programs and conducts several workshops leading the teaching faculty and the industry experts to review the results of this analysis for identified programs. In these workshops, considering the desired marketable qualifications of programs’ graduates, the faculty/industry teams will revise the curricula according to requirements of the job market and industry needs.

An evaluation and assessment workshop has been tentatively scheduled for August of 2015 to assess the universities implementation of the revised curricula and its progress.”

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November 24, 2014

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Dr. Hanline

Dr. Kelly Whalon and Dr. Mary Frances Hanline have received funding for a new U.S. Department of Education Office of Special Education Research Leadership personnel preparation grant, Autism Spectrum Disorders in the areas of science and mathematics education (ASD-STEM). The goal of ASD-STEM is to implement and evaluate a PhD program that prepares five scholars with expertise on adapting mathematics and science instruction for Pre-K-12 learners with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

College of Education faculty member Kelly Whalon.

Dr. Whalon

In a cohort model, scholars will participate in coursework, teaching, research, and service experiences consistent with the recommendations made by the Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate Report and The Foundation of Scholars. Dr. Whalon will serve as principal investigator, Dr. Hanline as co-principal investigator, and Drs. Reed and Jakubowski as project faculty. The grant begins January, 2015.

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November 21, 2014

An article written by Russell Walker, FSU College of Education Office of Research director, has been published in the December 2014 issue of the National Council of University Research Administrators (NCURA) magazine. The article titled, “Partnering to Propel Research – One College’s Strategy” is about the collaborative research programs and services that College of Education faculty at FSU have been provided.

russ walker

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November 14, 2014

Dr. Laura Osteen, adjunct faculty of higher education and director of The Center for Leadership and Social Change, has been named the 2014 recipient of the Ross Oglesby Award.

Click here to read more.

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November 12, 2014

Dr. Kathy Guthrie, associate professor of higher education at FSU, and Dr. Susan Komives, FSU alumna and professor emerita of student affairs at the University of Maryland, collaborate as co-editors of the New Directions for Student Leadership series to be released in February 2015.

https://fsuednews.com/2014/11/14/professor-and-alumna-co-edit-new-monograph-series-from-jossey-basswiley-publishers/

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October 28, 2014

College of Education faculty and staff headshots. Lara Perez-Felkner

Dr. Lara Perez-Felkner

Congratulations to Dr. Lara Perez-Felkner and Dr. Deborah Reed who have been selected for the Transformation Through Teaching recognition by the Spiritual Life Project at FSU.

Perez-Felkner is an assistant professor of higher education in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. She teaches graduate courses in Sociology of Education, Sociology of Higher Education, and Outcomes of Higher Education, and Applied Regression. Impressed by the enthusiasm and caliber of FSU students, she is currently collaborating with and supporting multiple graduate and undergraduate students involved in research on higher education policies and pathways to degrees in the sciences.

College of Education faculty and staff headshots. Deborah Reed

Dr. Deborah Reed

Reed is an assistant professor of special education in the School of Teacher Education where she teaches courses in reading instruction for students with high incidence disabilities such as Advanced Studies in Learning Disabilities, Response to Reading Intervention and Individualizing Reading Instruction for Students with Disabilities.

Reed is also a faculty member at the Florida Center for Reading Research. Her research focuses on the identification of and intervention for reading disabilities, particularly among adolescents.

Students nominated teachers for this recognition based on their transformational role in the students’ academic life. FSU’s Spiritual Life Project then chose the recipients based on the students’ compelling story. The Transformation Through Teaching dinner will be held on November 17 at the President’s House.

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October 20, 2014

Michael Giardina, professor of advertising

Dr. Michael Giardina

Dr. Michael Giardina, associate professor of sport management, has been appointed as the next editor for the Sociology of Sport Journal, the official journal of the North American Society for the Sociology of Sport. “It is arguably the leading journal in the field of Sport Management,” said Giardina. “It’s Impact Factor is nearly twice that of the field’s other major journal, the Journal of Sport Management.”

The Sociology of Sport Journal is the highest ranked sport-specific journal in the “Hospitality, Leisure, Sport, &Tourism” subject category, and 15th overall in-category. It is also ranked 46/137 in the general “Sociology” category.

Giardina’s three-year term as editor starts in November.

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October 15, 2014

Congratulations to two College of Education faculty members who have been selected as 2013-2014 Distance Learning Award Winners:

Dr. Joshua Newman (Sport Management): Distance Learning Award for Excellence in Online Course Design

Dr. Vanessa Dennen (Instructional Systems): Distance Learning Award for Excellence in Online Teaching and Distance Learning Award for Innovative and Effective Use of Technology

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October 4, 2014

Dr. Kathy Guthrie, assistant professor of higher education, and Dr. Laura Osteen, adjunct faculty of higher education, won research awards at the 2014 NASPA-FL Awards Conference.

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September 3, 2014

Congratulations to Dr. James Sampson, professor and associate dean for faculty development & administration, and Dr. Steven Pfeiffer, professor and coordinator of the Counseling Psychology/School Psychology combined Ph.D. program, who were elected to fellow status in the American Psychological Association (APA). Fellow status is an honor bestowed upon APA members who have shown evidence of unusual and outstanding contributions or performance in the field of psychology.

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September 2, 2014

Over the summer, our faculty at the College of Education received four federal grants totaling approximately $2.4 million dollars. Listed below are the principal investigators on these grants, as well as some information about each grant.

Principal Investigator: Dr. Motoko Akiba, Educational Leadership & Policy Studies
Co-Principal Investigator: Dr. Ian Whitacre, School of Teacher Education
Funding agency/program: NSF: DR K—12
Title: Identifying an Effective and Scalable Model of Lesson Study

Principal Investigator: Dr. Christine Andrews-Larson, School of Teacher Education
Funding agency/program: NSF: IUSE
Title: Collaborative Research: Teaching Inquiry-oriented Mathematics: Establishing Supports

Principal Investigator: Dr. Kelly Whalon, School of Teacher Education
Co-Principal Investigator: Dr. Mary Frances Hanline, School of Teacher Education
Funding agency: USDOE: Office of Special Education Programs,
Title: ASD-STEM

Co-Principal Investigators: Dr. Sherry Southerland, School of Teacher Education and Dr. Christine Andrews-Larson, School of Teacher Education
Funding agency/program: NSF: Robert Noyce Scholarship Program
Title: Preparing and Supporting Equitable Teaching in Mathematics and Science Classrooms: The FSU-Teach Noyce ProgramGrantsProfs

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT:
Dr. Toby Park
(850) 644-8168; tjpark@fsu.edu

By Kelli Gemmer
August 28, 2014

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – A research paper co-authored by Dr. Toby Park, assistant professor of educational leadership and policy studies and an associate director of the Center for Postsecondary Success at Florida State University, has been commissioned by The Civil Rights Project at UCLA to be presented Sept.2 at the United States Capitol Center in Washington, D.C.

Toby Park, Education Leadership & Policy. He chose #1

Dr. Toby Park

“Do Higher Education Accountability Proposals Narrow the Opportunity for Minority Students and Minority-Serving Institutions? What New Research Tells Us” is a higher education research and policy briefing for congressional staff, policymakers, advocates, researchers and the press.

“Students of color have not achieved equal opportunity for higher education and many of the institutions that serve them are struggling with economic and policy challenges,” says The Civil Rights Project at UCLA. “Some critics of the Obama Administration claim that recent accountability and financial aid policy changes would close the door to college for many deserving students.” This convening brings together seven research papers that examine these issues with the goal of avoiding unintended consequences that could be disadvantageous to minority students.

Dr. Stella Flores, lead author and professor at the Peabody College of Education and Human Development at Vanderbilt University, will present the paper co-authored by Park, which is entitled, “The Racial College Completion Gap: Evidence from Texas.”

In the paper, Flores and Park investigate how pre-college characteristics contribute to the achievement gap and how this contribution compares to postsecondary factors. “We must first understand inputs into postsecondary education if we are to make comparisons about outputs,” says Park. “This reasoning, however, may be overlooked with funding being tied to outcome measures.”

For more information on their related research, visit http://news.fsu.edu/More-FSU-News/Researcher-dispels-myths-of-minority-serving-institution-graduation-rates.

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August 19, 2014

Educational Leadership & Policy faculty have been hard at work in 2014. Faculty has published a total of 27 publications (17 refereed journal articles, 2 books, 8 book chapters and reviews) and a number of reports published or in press in 2014 alone. They also have a total award of $10,328,535 for research and service projects, which provided training and funding opportunities for graduate students, and many grant proposals currently under review. In addition, they house two top journals in the field: Educational Researcher and Comparative Education Review. For a complete list of faculty members, visit http://coe.fsu.edu/Faculty-Staff2/Faculty-Staff-Directory/ELPS-Faculty-Profiles/Educational-Leadership-Policy-Faculty

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August 8, 2014

Dr. Valerie Shute

Dr. Valerie Shute

Dr. Valerie Shute, professor of instructional systems, has partnered with Carney Labs to develop a computer game that teaches physics to students around the world. “Tomorrow’s workers need 21st century competencies that include being able to effectively solve hard problems, persist in the face of failure, and think creatively, critically, and systemically,” Shute said. “Our goal is to validly assess these 21st century competencies using games and other immersive learning environments as the main vehicle.” For more information, visit:

http://news.fsu.edu/More-FSU-News/New-partnership-uses-video-games-to-teach-physics?utm_content=buffer9c6a1&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

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August 5, 2014

S_Pfeiffer

Dr. Steven Pfeiffer

Dr. Steven Pfeiffer, professor and coordinator of the Combined Doctoral program in Counseling Psychology and School Psychology, will be the keynote speaker at the Czech Republic Gifted Conference in October.

Dr. Pfeiffer is a laureate of Excellence in Research, awarded by Mensa International Foundation for Education and Research for his work in the field of creativity and emotional intelligence. He is a recognized authority in the field of mental health of gifted children and their families.

For more information on the Czech Republic Gifted Conference, visit http://www.nadanizaci.cz/workshop/prednasky-prednasejici

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July 29, 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT: Dr. Toby Park
(850) 644-8168; tjpark@fsu.edu

By Kelli Gemmer

Toby Park, Education Leadership & Policy. He chose #1

Dr. Toby Park

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – A recent study co-authored by Dr. Toby Park, assistant professor in the Department of Educational Leadership & Policy and senior research associate in the Center for Postsecondary Success at FSU, revealed that minority students who attend historically black or Hispanic-serving colleges are just as likely to complete their undergraduate degree as similar minority students at traditional institutions. This challenges the previous notion that minority students who attend a minority-serving institution (MSI) will automatically face lower graduation rates than if they had attended a traditional college or university.

Park and lead author, Dr. Stella Flores, associate professor of Public Policy and Higher Education at Vanderbilt Peabody College of Education and Human Development, investigated degree attainment for Black and Hispanic students at historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and Hispanic-serving institutions (HSIs). The researchers looked past solely graduation statistics indicating that HBCUs are approximately 7 percent below traditional institutions while HSIs trail by about 11 percent.

After accounting for differences in the student populations and institutional resources, Flores and Park found no difference in graduation rates between MSIs and traditional (non-MSI) institutions. “Attending a minority-service institution does not appear to have the negative effect so often portrayed in the media,” says Park. “Given the fact that MSIs are historically underfunded, the fact that the student bodies – when matched with similar students at traditional institutions – graduate at equal rates is astonishing.”

By comparing students who were similar in preparation and background at MSIs and traditional schools, Flores and Park were able to determine a true and fair comparison on the likelihood of degree completion for black and Hispanic students. “MSIs really are doing more with less,” says Park.

Park’s general research focuses on postsecondary outcomes for populations of students who may have once been considered non-traditional. This includes student characteristics such as underrepresented minority students, low-income students, underprepared students, and first-generation students as well as their entry point into post secondary education. He currently serves as co-principal investigator for a multi-year grant, funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, to investigate the ongoing developmental educational reform in Florida.

See the links below for Park’s other work on community colleges in Texas:
USA Today-College
Inside Higher Education
The National Journal

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July 10, 2014

RobertCarr

Dr. Robert Carr

The Association of Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) has awarded Dr. Ronald L. Carr The 2014 Robert M. Gagné Award for Graduate Student Research in Instructional Design. He has been awarded this honor based on his dissertation, “Educational standards, teacher preparation, and metacognition instruction for elementary students: Studies in pre-college engineering education,” as a student in Purdue’s Learning Design and Technology program, prior to coming to work at FSU in January.

“Gagné’s work and the reputations of the ISD and LSI programs that grew from his work are what attracted me to FSU, so receiving this award that was named for him is a great honor for me,” says Carr. “Just to be able to work at FSU is an honor for me!”

Carr’s dissertation contains three separate studies involving instructional design in the context of P-12 engineering education. Two additional chapters introduce the studies and outline how they unite under the umbrella of situated educational research, which is a term used to represent the pragmatic and theoretical nature of instructional design and design research.

Carr has been working at Florida State University in the Florida Center for Research in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (FCR-STEM) program since graduating from Purdue University in December, where he studied Learning Design and Technology under Dr. Johannes Strobel.

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June 24, 2014

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Dr. Cecile Reynaud

 

Congratulations to Dr. Cecile Reynaud, research associate for sport management, who led the committee responsible for evaluating and recommending that USA Volleyball be officially designated as the National Governing Body (NGB) for the paralympic sport of sitting volleyball in the United States.

http://www.teamusa.org/USA-Volleyball/Features/2014/June/18/USAV-Designated-NGB-for-Sitting-Volleyball

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June 9, 2014

College of Education faculty and staff headshots. Patrice Iatarola

Dr. Patrice Iatarola

Dr. Patrice Iatarola, associate professor of educational leadership & policy, has been awarded a planning grant from the Council on Research and Creativity for her proposal “High School Accountability, Pushing Rigor: Evidence from Florida.” Dr. Iatarola is one of 16 faculty members at FSU who has been awarded a planning grant for Spring 2014.

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June 3, 2014

Dr. Shelbie Witte, assistant professor in the School of Teacher Education, collaborated with two FSU professors from the School of Library & Information Studies, Dr. Don Latham and Dr. Melissa Gross, in an article examining how teachers and school librarians are trained in their pre-service education to collaborate with each other. The article, published in School Library Research, volume 16, was recently honored as a Top Twenty publication by the American Library Association.

View LIRT’s Top Twenty

View the published article

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June 2, 2014

Congratulations to Dr. Alysia D. Roehrig, associate professor of educational psychology, and Elizabeth H. Brinkerhoff, doctoral candidate, on their book, “No More Sharpening Pencils During Work Time and Other Time Wasters” with the “Not This, But That” Heinemann Series. This researcher-teacher practitioner piece summarizes research about time management in the K-5 classroom and provides suggestions for planning and teaching that make every minute count.

“We need to evaluate how we spend time in our classroom by asking whether it is proportional to how valuable the activity is in fostering students’ independence and growth,” say Elizabeth Brinkerhoff and Alysia Roehrig. “If we want students to become adults who spend their time in purposeful, constructive ways, we need to give them opportunities to spend their time purposefully and take responsibility for how their time is spent.”

To learn more about time wasters and how teachers can use their time more efficiently, read the Q & A Series by Heinemann with both of our authors: Part 1 and Part 2

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May 8, 2014

Many of our faculty and staff are being recognized for their contributions in teaching, course development, and service.

Staff Nominations and Awards

Erika Bettilyon (SM), 10 years FSU service
Veronica Hill (STE), 20 years FSU service
Bunnie Stipling-Hunter (STE), 20 years FSU service

Bryan Richards (EPLS), nominated for 2014 Exemplary Service Award for the Division of Academic Affairs
Jessica Waters (OASIS), nominated for 2014 Exemplary Service Award for the Division of Academic Affairs

Faculty Teaching Awards and Nominations

Angie Davis (STE), 2013-14 University Undergraduate Teaching Award
Sandy Lewis (STE), 2013-14 University Undergraduate Teaching Award

Laura Ballard (STE), Nomination for 2013-14 University Teaching Award
Rebecca Galeano (STE), Nomination for 2013-14 University Teaching Award
Michael Giardina (SM), Nomination for 2013-14 University Teaching Award
Kathy Guthrie (ELPS), Nomination for 2013-14 University Teaching Award
Ithel Jones (STE), Nomination for 2013-14 University Teaching Award
MaLynn Kelso (FSU-Teach), Nomination for 2013-14 University Teaching Award
Debra Osborn (EPLS), Nomination for 2013-14 University Teaching Award
Cecile Reynaud (SM), Nomination for 2013-14 University Teaching Award
Alysia Roehrig-Byce (EPLS), Nomination for 2013-14 University Teaching Award
Linda Schrader (ELPS), Nomination for 2013-14 University Teaching Award

Office of Distance Learning Award Nominations (awards have not been announced yet)

Joshua Newman (SM), Nomination for Excellence in Online Course Design Award (2 courses nominated)
Dina Vyortkina (OIIT), Nomination for Excellence in Online Course Design Award (3 courses nominated)
Vanessa Dennen (EPLS), Nomination for Innovative and Effective Use of Technology Award
Vanessa Dennen (EPLS), Nomination for Excellence in Online Teaching Award
Rhonda Blackwell-Flanagan, Nomination for Excellence in Online Teaching Award

Congratulations to all!

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April 11, 2014

steven i. pfeiffer2 copy

Dr. Steven Pfeiffer

 

Congratulations to Dr. Steven Pfeiffer, professor and director of clinical training, who is the keynote speaker for an international gifted conference being held outside of Milan, Italy at the University of Pavia on April 4th – 6th. The subject of his presentation is “Best Practices in Gifted Assessment.” He has also been invited speak to parents on the topic of “Raising a Psychologically Well Adjusted Gifted Child.” These talks include his work on the importance of nurturing both “strengths of the head” and “strengths of the heart.”

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March 7, 2014

FSU faculty receives initial research funding to study changes to developmental education

Studying Developmental Education Reform in the Sunshine State
Dramatic changes to developmental education in Florida to be studied by a team of researchers from Florida State University with initial support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

A research team at Florida State University (FSU), led by professor of higher education Dr. Shouping Hu, has received initial funding support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to study the comprehensive reform in developmental education in the State of Florida. Other faculty researchers on the project include Dr. David Tandberg and Dr. Toby Park, both assistant professors at FSU.

The Legislation
Through Senate Bill 1720, the Florida legislature drastically restructured developmental education placement and instruction. The new law mandates that the 28 state colleges (formerly the community colleges) in the Florida College System provide developmental education that is more tailored to the needs of students. The law gives students much more flexibility in terms of whether they enroll in developmental education and what options they can choose from if they need it. Some students who previously would have tested into developmental education will be able to skip it altogether. The methods for offering developmental education will change too, as instruction is to be offered in ways that move students quickly into college credit, using co-requisite instruction, modules, and tutoring. Colleges have received additional flexibility in placing students and college placement testing will no longer be required for most Florida public high school graduates. Finally, admission counseling, with regard to available options, is mandated for all incoming students.

The Project
The FSU research project will document the implementation process of the new legislation and assess the impact of the new developmental education reform on student progression and success. Specifically, the FSU research team intends to study how the Florida state colleges are implementing the reform measures outlined in Senate Bill 1720 and the underlying decision rationales in approaches to advising and developmental education offerings. The team also seeks to understand the patterns of student choice related to developmental education options and the effects of student choices on educational progression and success.

According to Dr. Hu, “This is the most significant state law affecting developmental education that we are aware of anywhere in the country. Because of its sweeping nature, it is critical that we begin documenting and evaluating its impact from the very beginning so that state legislatures and educational leaders here in Florida and other states have credible and timely evidence to further improve educational policies and practices.”

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College of Education faculty and staff.

Dr. Debra Osborn

 March 21, 2014

Congratulations to Dr. Debra Osborn who has been honored as an ACA Fellow for the American Counseling Association.
Osborn is an assistant professor of psychological and counseling services in the Educational Psychology and Learning Systems Department.

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March 14, 2014

Dr.-Young-Suk-Kim_small

Dr. Young-Suk Kim

Congratulations to Dr. Young-Suk Kim, associate professor in reading education/language arts, who has been selected for a Developing Scholar Award by the FSU Council on Research and Creativity. The award, which is based on an evaluation of her scholarly activities at FSU, will provide support for the continuation of her academic research.

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Media Release From Florida Center for Reading Research

Florida State University Researcher Selected for Presidential Award
January 9, 2014

President Barack Obama recently awarded the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers to 102 of the nation’s top researchers including Florida State University researcher Dr. Young-Suk Kim. The award is the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on scientists and engineers in the early stages of their independent research careers. Dr. Kim, an associate professor of Education and researcher at the Florida Center for Reading Research, was recognized for her research in language and literacy development. She is one of only two award recipients honored by the U.S. Department of Education. She will receive the award at a ceremony in Washington, D.C. later this year.

The following excerpt is from the White House press release:

“The impressive achievements of these early-stage scientists and engineers are promising indicators of even greater successes ahead,” President Obama said. “We are grateful for their commitment to generating the scientific and technical advancements that will ensure America’s global leadership for many years to come.”

The Presidential Early Career Awards embody the high priority the Obama Administration places on producing outstanding scientists and engineers to advance the Nation’s goals, tackle grand challenges, and contribute to the American economy. The recipients are employed or funded by the following departments and agencies: Department of Agriculture, Department of Commerce, Department of Defense, Department of Education, Department of Energy, Department of Health and Human Services, Department of the Interior, Department of Veterans Affairs, Environmental Protection Agency, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Science Foundation, the Smithsonian Institution, and the Intelligence Community, which join together annually to nominate the most meritorious scientists and engineers whose early accomplishments show the greatest promise for assuring America’s preeminence in science and engineering and contributing to the awarding agencies’ missions.

The awards, established by President Clinton in 1996, are coordinated by the Office of Science and Technology Policy within the Executive Office of the President. Awardees are selected for their pursuit of innovative research at the frontiers of science and technology and their commitment to community service as demonstrated through scientific leadership, public education, or community outreach.

Dr. Kim’s primary research areas include language and literacy acquisition and instruction, including early literacy predictors, reading fluency and comprehension, and writing. Dr. Kim is currently a Principal Investigator and Co-Investigator of several studies funded by the Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and the National Research Foundation of Korea.

Dr. Kim joined the FSU faculty and FCRR in 2007 after receiving her doctoral degree from Harvard University.

View the Original Media Release Here: http://www.fcrr.org/about-fcrr/kim_award_release.asp

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The following pictures are of Shouping Hu‘s recent visit to Sun Yet-Sen University in Guangzhou, China.  Hu made two presentations there: one for the international forum where the main audiences are scholars from major research universities in China, and another for student affairs professionals from all colleges and universities from Guangdong Province.

P&S

Hu3

Hu1

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The College of Education is delighted to announce that three of our faculty members – Angel Canto (EPLS), Rebecca Galeano (STE), and Amy Guerette (STE) – have each received a $12,000 Planning Grant from the FSU Council for Research and Creativity (CRC).  Planning grants are primarily intended to provide faculty with initial funding to support a previously unfunded line of research, with the expectation being that the initial funding will lead to the faculty applying for and receiving external funding support. Congratulations Angel, Rebecca, and Amy!

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Dr. Cecile Reynaud

 

Cecile Reynaud (Sport Management) has been named team leader for the USA Women’s Sitting Volleyball team for the 2012 Paralympics Games.  She will travel to London (March 12-15) to tour the Olympic Village and competition sites, and return for the Paralympics Games August 29 – September 8.

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College Supporting Literacy Research Conference

The FSU College of Education is generously supporting the 2012 NCTE Assembly for Research Midwinter Conference to be held at the University of Alabama from February 24-26. Dr. Lisa Scherff, associate professor of Reading and Language Arts, is serving as chair of the Conference. The conference is bringing in some of the country’s leading literacy teachers and researchers including Ernest Morrell, Mariana Souto-Manning, and Ruth Vinz from Teachers College; David Bloome and Valerie Kinloch from Ohio State University; and Cathy Compton-Lilly from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The conference will also feature a talk by award-winning Chicano poet and author Luis J. Rodriguez.

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Congratulations, Vic Sampson!

Victor Sampson, assistant professor of science at the College of Education, has been awarded the 2012 Early Career Research Award by the National Association for Research in Teaching (NARST). Recipients of this high honor must be in the first seven years of their career and demonstrate the ability to provide valuable and continuous contributions to research of science education.  NARST, a worldwide organization, has been focusing their efforts on improving science education, teaching, and learning through research since 1928.

Sampson began work in the School of Teacher Education and with FSU-Teach in August of 2007.  He received his Master’s degree in Secondary Science Education from Seattle University and his Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction with a concentration in Science Education from Arizona State University.

Sampson will accept the award on March 27 at the 2012 Annual International Conference of the National Association of Research in Science Teaching (NARST) in Indianapolis.

(There is no cash associated with the award.)

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Dr. Ithel Jones

Jones Publishes New Book

Ithel Jones, a professor in the School of Teacher Education, had a new book, co-authored with Dr. Vickie Lake (University of Oklahoma) published on February 1, 2012.  The book is based on field trials of lessons developed with FSU student teachers in Leon County Schools.  So far, the reviews have been excellent! For more information, visit:   http://www.freespirit.com/catalog/item_detail.cfm?item_id=767 

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February 2012

$8.5 MILLION NIH GRANT MAY HELP DECIPHER DYSLEXIA

TALLAHASSEE, Fla.  If you can read this sentence with ease, consider yourself fortunate: Millions of Americans with dyslexia cannot. In the hope of improving the lives of those struggling readers, a team of experts at Florida State University is working to better understand and diagnose dyslexia and other learning disabilities with a new, $8.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health.

Today, a person with a learning disability is less likely to graduate from high school and more likely to be unemployed as an adult, according to the National Center for Learning Disabilities. The stakes are getting higher as success in life becomes more and more dependent on one’s ability to read.

“Back when I was in school, children in my hometown of Akron, Ohio, who struggled with reading would drop out and get a job in manufacturing and make a really good living doing that,” said Richard Wagner, Florida State’s Robert O. Lawton Distinguished Professor of Psychology and a principal investigator on the project. “Now it is difficult to even work at a fast food restaurant if you struggle with reading.”

The five-year grant will allow faculty at FSU’s Florida Center for Reading Research (FCRR) to continue work begun five years ago through a prior NIH award that funded a learning- disabilities research center –– one of just four such centers across the country, and the only one in the Southeast.

“The formal name for this is the Multidisciplinary Learning Disabilities Center,” said Wagner, an associate director of the center. “We have educators, we have psychologists, we have people from other disciplines who rub elbows every day. Because of that, we already work collaboratively, and that was critical for being able to get the NIH award.”

With its wide range of experts from various disciplines, the FCRR is well positioned to tackle the complex problem of dyslexia. The fact that Florida State researchers have won this competitive award for the second consecutive time reflects the high regard held by the National Institutes of Health for the research done at the center, said Francis Eppes Professor of Education and FCRR Director Barbara Foorman.

“This research team, led by Dr. Wagner, is poised to make even greater progress in advancing our understanding of a set of disabilities affecting some 15 to 20 percent of the population,” Foorman said.

Previous research at the learning disabilities center has pointed the current studies in some new directions.

For instance, when researchers wrote the original proposal, finding a specific “candidate gene” for dyslexia –– a kind of smoking gun that would account for the genetic aspect of the disability –– seemed very promising. However, Wagner acknowledges that initial work shows the problem to be much more complex.

“Now it’s looking like the genetic susceptibility for dyslexia probably won’t be localized into one or even a handful of genes,” said Wagner, ”but is, in fact, represented more by the complex interactions among a large number of genes and areas of the genome that do not appear to contain genes.”

The environment also plays a role in dyslexia, Wagner said, making it all the more important to identify the disability early. Today, risk for future reading problems in children can be identified as young as age 3.

“It is really important to be able to identify children as early as possible and try to provide them with prevention programs that are designed to strengthen weak areas,” said Wagner, “so that when they do get to the point of learning to read, they will have a better outcome than they would otherwise.”

Other researchers serving as principal investigators on the grant include Florida State University faculty members Carol Connor (FCRR and Department of Psychology), Christopher Lonigan (FCRR and Psychology), Yaacov Petscher (FCRR), Christopher Schatschneider (FCRR and Psychology) and Jeanette Taylor (Psychology). Joining them is Elena Grigorenko of Yale University’s Child Study Center.

Co-investigators on the project include Florida State faculty members Barbara Foorman (FCRR and School of Teacher Education), Sara Hart (FCRR and Department of Psychology), Mike Kaschak (Psychology), Young-Suk Kim (FCRR, School of Teacher Education), Beth Phillips (FCRR and Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems) and Jeanne Wanzek (FCRR and School of Teacher Education).

To read this article online and view associated images and a video, visit the FSU news site.

About the FCRR:

The Florida Center for Reading Research (FCRR) is the nation’s premier research organization devoted to literacy. The center’s faculty boasts the broadest and deepest collection of reading experts in the world. Established in 2002 by the Florida Legislature, the FCRR is jointly administered at Florida State by the Learning Systems Institute and the College of Arts and Sciences.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Rabieh Razzouk, associate director, Learning Systems Institute

(850) 694-1682; rrazzouk@lsi.fsu.edu

February 2012

$10.5 MILLION GRANT WILL EXPAND VAST ONLINE HUB FOR EDUCATORS, BY EDUCATORS

Florida K-12 Teachers Look to ‘CPALMS’ for State Standards, Teaching Tools, Peer Support

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Between teaching, paperwork, assessments, discipline and grading, schoolteachers have a demanding job, and lately it’s becoming even tougher.

To help meet some of these challenges, thousands of Florida educators rely on a free, online system built at Florida State University that guides them to teaching tools and resources, just when they need them. Soon –– thanks to a $10.5 million grant from the Florida Department of Education using federal Race to the Top funds –– that system will become much more powerful and relevant to teachers across the country.

Called CPALMS (pronounced “see palms”), the system is the official source for state K-12 education standards and course information. It provides tools for educators to build and share resources to support standards-driven instruction in mathematics, science and reading/language arts. Conceived, designed and built for educators by the Learning Systems Institute (LSI) at Florida State, CPALMS also connects educators with professional development and peer support.

With the new, two-and-a-half-year grant, Florida State researchers at LSI’s Florida Center for Research in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (FCR-STEM) will enlarge and enhance CPALMS to create a single, open platform housing a vast network of tools, products and resources for educators. The improvements will build on an already successful system that gets an average of 10,000 visitors a day from across Florida and the globe.

“We’re thrilled that teachers love CPALMS but not surprised,” said Rabieh Razzouk, associate director of LSI and principal investigator on the grant. “From the start, Florida educators have been deeply involved in creating this system and reviewing the resources that go into it.”

CPALMS currently features some 3,600 resources, with new ones added daily. When teachers share a resource, peer teachers and subject-matter experts carefully review it. This review process not only ensures that CPALMS materials are high-quality, it also gives feedback to teachers in a way that provides unique, relevant professional development.

Florida teachers follow state standards specifying what concepts should be taught at each grade. However, Florida is shifting to the Common Core State Standards, which have been adopted by most states and outline a consistent framework to prepare students for college and the work force. The new grant will allow educators to align all CPALMS resources with both sets of standards, creating tools and resources valuable to teachers across the country.

The grant also will allow thousands of new contributed resources to be vetted and added to the system; make it easier for educational partners to build on the platform; and create learning progression maps, messaging tools and other cutting-edge applications to help educators plan and collaborate more effectively.

CPALMS will integrate the iCPALMS platform, developed by FCR-STEM with funding from the National Science Foundation, to host apps and tools that leverage the information and resources from CPALMS to provide users just-in-time supports and materials.

“I am proud of the fact that more than 1,000 teachers from 49 districts submitted a letter of support to our proposal within days of our request,” Razzouk said. “We’re leading the pack with innovative ideas and functionality –– all at no cost to teachers or districts.”

Not only is the price right –– so is the product, said Steve Trotman, a math teacher and department chair from Walton County who was one of the Florida educators to voice support for the CPALMS proposal.

“CPALMS is a critical resource for teachers throughout the state of Florida,” Trotman wrote. “Budget cuts, personnel cuts and material shortages have placed an even greater premium on ‘teacher time.’ CPALMS provides a tremendous time-saving tool so teachers do not need to reinvent the wheel.”

Before CPALMS, teachers often resorted to Google to find teaching resources, searches that yielded a haystack’s worth of mostly irrelevant, ad-laden, inaccurate or inappropriate material, according to former Brevard County kindergarten teacher Christine Tarver, now a researcher with LSI.

In contrast, CPALMS can hone in on and even anticipate the pedagogical needle that meets a specific teacher’s need to teach to a specific benchmark or standard with a specific group of students.

“Thanks to the new grant,” Tarver said, “CPALMS will soon include ‘smart’ tools that learn and adapt to teachers’ needs based on their past use of the system. Those tools will recommend high-quality resources and professional development modules in a timely way, just as educators need them.”

The new system comes at a critical time: While the need for workers competent in the so-called “STEM” fields of science, technology, engineering and math is increasing, student performance in these subjects lags.

According to state assessments, math performance declines significantly as students move to higher grades. And the picture is even bleaker in science: Fewer than half of students in grades 5, 8 and 11 are proficient in the subject.

Improving teaching and learning in these fields is vital not only to these students’ careers, said LSI director Laura Lang, but to Florida’s economy, as well.

“Increasingly, STEM is where the jobs are, where the money is and where our future lies,” said Lang, a co-principal investigator on the new grant. “CPALMS is doing a lot to help educators meet that challenge and, given the funded expansion, it will be able to do a great deal more.”

Also on the research team are co-principal investigator Danielle Sherdan of FCR-STEM and co-investigators Young-Suk Kim and Jeanne Wanzek, both of Florida State’s College of Education and the Florida Center for Reading Research, another LSI center. Project partners include the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Purdue University, WestEd, and Sciberus, the software development company that helped create CPALMS and iCPALMS.

To learn more about CPALMS and its new, $10.5 million grant, contact Razzouk at (850) 694-1682 or rrazzouk@lsi.fsu.edu.

To read this article online and view associated images, visit the FSU news site.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

January 2012

Tom Butler

CONTACT: Tom Butler, Office of Research

(850) 644-8634; tbutler@admin.fsu.edu

 

FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY AWARDED $38 MILLION

TO HELP SPUR PUBLIC EDUCATION IMPROVEMENTS

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Flexing its considerable research muscle, the Florida Center for Reading Research (FCRR) at Florida State University has won a $38.6 million contract to help six Southeastern states and their schools put the test results, coursework information, graduation statistics and other education-related data they collect to more effective use in helping students find academic success.

The five-year award, funded through the U.S. Department of Education’s Institute of Education Sciences, makes FCRR the lead for the region in connecting education stakeholders to student data in more meaningful and positive ways.

“Winning this sizable contract clearly showcases the talent we have at Florida State and reinforces our position as a focal point for education research in the nation,” said Florida State President Eric J. Barron. “Through the award, the Florida Center for Reading Research will help others understand the power of the information available to them and how it can be used to improve their schools, ultimately putting our region on a path to greater student achievement in the years ahead.”

The contract will support FCRR and its research partners with operating the Regional Educational Laboratory for the Southeast Region (REL-SE), serving Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina and South Carolina. Regional laboratories conduct applied research and evaluation, provide technical assistance, develop digital educational materials and other products, and disseminate information in an effort to help others use knowledge from research and practice to improve education.

“Strip away all the acronyms and complex language and you find that this effort is about answering one basic question: How do we use the myriad of information we collect to make measurable improvements to our education systems?” said Barbara Foorman, director and principal investigator for the REL-SE and director of FCRR. “With this contract, we have gained the resources we need to tackle that question and help our local education stakeholders find new success in improving student learning.”

Foorman, who is also Florida State’s Francis Eppes Professor of Education, added that FCRR partnered with RMC Research, SEDL and the Instructional Research Group (IRG) to create the winning proposal.

The heart of the project will focus on four main priority areas, identified through extensive outreach to a broad array of education stakeholders throughout the Southeast:

·      Improving low-performing schools.

·      Scaling up the implementation of more rigorous standards, particularly in mathematics.

·      Determining charter school effectiveness and improving their performance.

·      Improving adolescent literacy.

For more information about the contract and to view FCRR’s proposal, visit the Regional Educational Laboratories grant website.

About FCRR:

The Florida Center for Reading Research (FCRR) is the nation’s premier research organization devoted to literacy. The center’s faculty boasts the broadest and deepest collection of reading experts in the world. Established in 2002 by the Florida Legislature, FCRR is jointly administered at Florida State University by the FSU Learning Systems Institute and the College of Arts and Sciences.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACTS: Ellen Granger, FSU Teach co-director, (850) 644-6747; granger@bio.fsu.edu

Sherry Southerland, FSU-Teach co-director, (850) 645-4667; ssoutherland@fsu.edu

By Libby Fairhurst

January 2012

$100,000 TO ‘FSU-TEACH’ WILL BOOST TRAINING OF MATH, SCIENCE TEACHERS

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — The Florida State University FSU-Teach program –– which trains math and science majors to become much-needed math and science classroom teachers –– has received a $100,000 share of a $500,000 donation from AT&T to the National Math and Science Initiative (NMSI).

Florida State is one of five universities among which the AT&T contribution to NMSI will be divided to support programs modeled after UTeach, a highly successful initiative that originated at the University of Texas-Austin in 1997 and enables students majoring in math, science or computer science to receive full teaching certification without adding time or cost to their degrees.

Since 2008, NMSI has partnered with the UTeach Institute to implement the path-breaking program for recruiting and preparing math and science teachers in universities across the country. Florida State was one of the first universities to implement the program –– and, in the past three years, FSU-Teach has seen enrollment in its math and science teaching coursework triple, according to the program’s co-directors, Ellen Granger and Sherry Southerland.

“Our economy demands workers and citizens who are prepared to develop and use mathematics and science knowledge to solve real-world problems,” said Florida State University President Eric J. Barron. “Meeting this demand requires mathematics and science teachers who can effectively teach students in ways that equip them to apply and use their knowledge. Through their support of FSU-Teach, AT&T is forging a partnership between private industry and public universities –– and such partnerships are essential if we are to both attract the top students into teaching and support the education of this new breed of teacher.”

Mary Ann Rankin, CEO of NMSI, said the support from AT&T would help to create a new generation of math and science teachers in the United States, which needs an additional 280,000 math and science teachers by 2015.

AT&T Florida President Marshall Criser III said his company was acutely aware of the nation’s need for more skilled workers in the critical fields of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

“All Americans will need to be more STEM proficient to be competitive in the 21st century,” Criser said. “We are proud to be supporting UTeach, which is providing the solution and inspiration on campuses nationwide to move our country forward.”

Nationwide since 2008, enrollment in science and math majors has increased significantly at UTeach replication sites, which to date have been established at 29 universities.

“Demand for the UTeach program continues to grow,” Rankin said. “This proves that more college students will seek careers as math and science teachers if you provide an approach that makes sense. What we must do now is engage more far-sighted corporations such as AT&T –– as well as foundations, and state governments  –– to take this proven program to more college students across the nation.”

Granger said the core elements of the FSU-Teach program include:

·      Active recruitment and incentives, such as reimbursement (from an endowment fund established for FSU-Teach) for tuition for the first two courses so that students can discover for free if teaching is for them.

·      A compact degree program that allows students to graduate in four years with a double major –– one in mathematics or a science and one in mathematics or science teaching.

·      A strong focus on acquiring deep content knowledge in math and science, in addition to research-based teaching strategies focusing on teaching and learning math and science.

·      Early and intensive field teaching experience, beginning in the FSU-Teach students’ first semester and continuing throughout the program.

·      Close involvement of mathematicians and scientists to shape students development as teachers

·      Personal guidance from experienced master teachers, FSU faculty and public school teachers

Visit the FSU-Teach website and watch an FSU-Teach video to learn more about math and science teacher recruitment and training efforts at Florida State University.

To read this article online and view an associated image, visit the FSU news site.

In addition to FSU-Teach at Florida State, the AT&T donation to NMSI will be divided among U-Teach replication programs at the University of California at Berkeley; the University of California at Irvine; the University of Northern Arizona; and the University of Florida.

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Training more educators for children with special needs in high-risk families is goal of $1.2 million grant to Florida State

FSU EdNews

January 2012

For the increasing number of “high-risk” families in Florida facing the complex challenges of infants and toddlers with disabilities and developmental delays, additional help is on the way.

Two Florida State University professors have received a $1.2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education to train more educators in specialized early intervention and support.

“We are grateful that the U.S. Department of Education has once again recognized Florida State University’s extraordinary expertise and impact in educational policy and research,” President Eric J. Barron said.

The grant to Mary Frances Hanline, a professor of early childhood special education in the College of Education, and Juliann Woods, a professor in the School of Communication Science and Disorders, will support their Personnel Preparation in Early Intervention and Education Project. The five-year project aims to improve the quality and increase the number of personnel who are fully credentialed to serve children with disabilities from birth to age 5.

The new grant will enable Hanline and Woods to provide online courses to practicing early-intervention professionals throughout the state.

And for Florida State students preparing for careers in special education and early childhood education, the grant will mean enhanced opportunities for training in early intervention.

“Dr. Woods and I will be expanding the content of existing academic coursework and of field-based experiences, which will take place in programs providing services to ‘high-need’ families who need specialized intervention and support,” said Hanline, the Personnel Preparation in Early Intervention and Education Project principal investigator.

Among the project’s goals: Work with a total of 71 students over the next five years to produce 22 speech pathologists, 27 early-childhood special educators and 22 interdisciplinary pre-service professionals.

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Dr. Aubteen Darabi

Congratulations Dr. Darabi!

Dr. Aubteen Darabi, associate program director at Florida State University’s Learning Systems Institute, received the 2011 Innovators Award from the university. The honor recognized Darabi’s leading role in developing a performance-based training system that advances the knowledge and skills of seaport security personnel.

Darabi was one of 10 faculty members recognized at the 7th Annual Florida State University Innovators Reception on Dec. 5 for having their technology commercialized through a license or option agreement in the fiscal year ending in June.

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